Category Archives: mLearning

Digital distraction

Digital Distraction

“The mere presence of a cell or smartphone on the table can disengage people during in-person conversations and hinder their empathy, according to a new Virginia Tech study that finds your attention is divided even if you’re not actively looking at your phone.”

The article ‘Your smartphone could be turning you into a lousy friend – even when you’re not using it‘ is as much about the social impact of the always-on connections we have through our mobile devices as it is about how we manage them.

“For many, digital distraction involves the “constant urge to seek out information, check for communication and direct their thoughts to other people and worlds,” the authors write.”

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10 steps to mobile learning adoption

10 steps to mobile learning adoption (@jiscinfonet)

The ‘mobile learning’ toolkit from JISC is excellent, go take a look. I’ve brought this one aspect to the fore … ’10 steps to mobile learning adoption’

“The generic 10-step process outlined in the image above has been adapted from Gary Woodill’s very detailed mLearning Road Map and is a useful overview as to how to successfully implement a mobile learning initiative:”

10 steps to mobile learning adoption
JISC InfoNet: 10 steps to mobile learning adoption

  1. Write mobile learning vision statement
  2. Gather stakeholder requirements
  3. Agree on scope
  4. Obtain senior manager buy-in
  5. Identify required content
  6. Decide in-house or external development
  7. Identify champions
  8. Create and test beta content
  9. Gain feedback and iterate offering
  10. Roll out to wider group

What do you think? Would you add anything, or take anything away?

Reference:
JISC InfoNet. 2011. Mobile Learning. Available from: http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/infokits/mobile-learning/ [Accessed: 20 March, 2014].

Challenging mobile learning discourse through research: Student perceptions of Blackboard Mobile Learn and iPads

Student Perceptions of Blackboard Mobile Learn and iPads #edtech

From my previous post about designing Blackboard courses for a mobile-first delivery, and the discussion I’ve been having with Peter Reed and friends on his blog, this paper came at a good time to further the question “do we need this?” – AJET: “Student Perceptions of Blackboard Mobile Learn and iPads”

Well, do we? The paper concludes in saying that the students “did not demand mobile learning and were in fact mostly neutral about the experience” and that “they did not perceive a notable improvement to their learning” (Kinesh et al, 2012). While the students did not report an opposition to the inclusion of the mobile App, they also are not reported to have had any prior experience of it, a preference to mobile learning that was not limited to Blackboard Mobile Learn, nor they opinions (positive or negative) to mobile learning in general.  Continue reading

Global Mobile Learning

Free Book on Mobile Learning Research #mLearning

Thanks to Inge Ignatia de Waard for pointing this out, this free ebook (well, PDF edition that looks like a book) on global mobile learning has some interesting research.

Global Mobile LearningThe highlights for me include subjects and research like:

  • State of Mobile Learning Around the World
  • Mobile Learning in International Development 
  • Planning for Mobile Learning Implementation 
  • Blended Mobile Learning: Expanding Learning Spaces with Mobile Technologies 
  • Mobile and Digital: Perspectives on Teaching and Learning in a Networked World 
  • Using mLearning and MOOCs to Understand Chaos, Emergence, and Complexity in Education 
  • Changing the Way of Learning: Mobile Learning in China 
  • Challenges for Successful Adoption of Mobile Learning 
  • Mobile Microblogging: Using Twitter and Mobile Devices in an Online Course to Promote Learning in Authentic Contexts 

Read it online here: ‘Global Mobile Learning Implementations and Trends’

BYOD4L

‘Bring Your Own Device for Learning’ #BYOD4L @MELSIGUK

MEL SIGNew Year, new challenges, new opportunities. That’s as much happy-stuff I can muster at the moment – it’s the 3rd day back to work after a wonderful, but tiring, 2 week festive break and I’ve got a stinker of a cold (not that you wanted to hear that).

So, to start the year on a positive note this course, ‘Bring Your Own Device for Learning’, not only attracted my attention but I was also invited to help create and facilitate it. Running from January 27th to 31st, the ‘Bring Your Own Device for Learning’ (BYOD4L) short (open) course, is from the Media-Enhanced Learning Special Interest Group. Participants will be able to immerse themselves (students or teachers) in a range of opportunities to explore the use of smart devices for learning and teaching in their professional context in an immersive, open and collaborative environment.

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Research in Learning Technology

Reading: “Pupil perspectives on using mobile devices for learning”

The advance of mobile devices into our everyday lives continues, and doesn’t look to falter any time soon (if at all).

As educators and facilitators we talk and plan and design and write about implementing and using these devices (phones, tablets, etc.) as either part of the learning process or as an ancillary device, something additional, to where we want the learning to take place. But are we taking the students’ needs and hopes and desires into account when we do this, or do we think we already know and plough ahead regardless?

As I said in the ‘Improving Learning with Mobile Technology’ eBook “If children are spending more and more time connected online, then it stands to reason that some of this time will be in class. In your class? What are you doing about it?”. This is why the article in Research in Learning Technology - ‘‘I don’t think I would be where I am right now’’. Pupil perspectives on using mobile devices for learning – is relevant and important … it highlights the students’ perspective in a comparison bet ween two academies where mobile devices are encouraged in one and banned in the other.

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Tapping Into Mobile Learning

Tapping into Mobile Learning

Another infographic, this time looking into how we can tap into mobile learning. Some figures from the infographic for you:

  • Only 17% of surveyed schools state that children are required to use mobile or portable devices in the classroom, and only 16% allow BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). Whether this is 16% of the previous 17% who allow the use of mobile devices or 16% of everyone surveyed is not clear.
  • Parents view the use of the use of mobile devices are used more effectively in early years classrooms to promote curiosity than in later years, but it is still significantly higher than for other uses, e.g. to foster creativity, to teach languages or reading.
  • Parents of children who are being encouraged to use mobile devices are more positive about the learning and educational potential of mobile learning. Notable differences in how parents view their child’s performance between those classrooms where mobile learning is required, to those where it is not, shows the biggest divide.
  • 2/3 or parents think schools should help students use devices safely.
  • 2/3 also agree that the very same mobile devices can distract children from learning.
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Mobile Education - Lessons from 35 Education Experts on Improving Learning with Mobile Technology

Improving Learning with Mobile Technology

A couple of months ago I was asked to contribute to an eBook about mobile learning and changes in attitudes and technology …  “what are the most effective uses of technology in online and mobile education?” Along with 34 leading educators and mobile learning ‘celebrities’ our answers have been included in a new eBook that has the sub-title “Move Over Teachers: The Students Are in Control”.

I find myself listed among friends and colleagues who I look to and respect in the community of learning, including (but not limited to):

  • Joyce Seitzinger
  • Grainne Conole
  • Alec Couros
  • Lisa Dawley
  • Jackie Gerstein
  • Sidneyeve Matrix
  • Lisa Nielsen
  • Pati Shank
  • Shelly Sanches Terrell
  • Tony Vincent

Each essay/response has come together, independently, to form a common theme around the advances in technology and how we choose to use it; devices, networks, content, teaching, collaboration, etc.  Continue reading

Iron Stairs / Mobile Learning

Mobile Learning

Iron Stairs / Mobile LearningI will hold my hands up and say I want an experience of ‘good’ mobile learning.

I know there are (or rather should be, we’ve been talking about it for long enough now) examples out there, but I haven’t ‘seen’ them. I have tried using mobile devices and a browser, I’ve tried Institutional VLEs and downloadable ‘courses’ through iTunes and iTunesU. I’ve tried different Apps (some linked to VLEs and some not) yet none were particularly any good and certainly not good enough to stop me going back to a desktop or laptop PC. I look forward to seeing how FutureLearn works as it is supposed to be developed with the mobile learning at the fore, but do not necessarily want to limit myself to MOOCs, or indeed MOOCs from one provider.

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