Tag Archives: CMALT

Learning Technologist pt.15

What is a Learning Technologist? Pt. 15

In May 2015 I joined Warwick Business School, WBS, as an eLearning Consultant. In September the same year I was awarded the ‘highly commended’ Learning Technologist of the Year award from the Association for Learning Technology (ALT). The strange thing is, that was the last time I posted about being a Learning Technologist here. After 14 posts I stopped.

There’s no reason for it, I didn’t even realise I’d done it until a few tweets last night from Clare Thompson (@ClareThomsonQUB) and Sue Beckingham (@suebecks) reminded me about it. Yes, I’ve continued to write about work and wider reading of the industry we’re in, but this is Clare’s tweet that prompted me to write here again, about being a Learning Technologist:

In the last two years I thought of and collaborated on, edited and then self-published  The Really Useful #EdTechBook. I’ve developed, supported, mentored, facilitated, and bled/wept over the creation of two MOOCs for the University of Warwick (Big Data and Literature and Mental Health). I’ve facilitated a total of 15 runs/presentations of all five Warwick MOOCs. I’ve two other MOOCs in development at the moment, one of which took myself and colleagues to Italy recently to interview and film important individuals for case study and ‘thought’ pieces who were attending an event in Prato Centre, Monash University, Italy. Oh, and I’ve met & interviewed Sir Ian McKellen and Stephen Fry, all part of the day job!!

YouTube: Literature and Mental Health

Outside of work on MOOCs I’ve been included on the EdTech Magazine list for 2015 and 2016 lists for ‘Top 50 IT Blogs Influential Blogs in Higher Education’ and the 50 Most Influential HE Professionals Using Social Media list. I was interviewed for the published work on How has Apple transformed your classroom? Part I, the Teacher’s Practical Guide to the Flipped Classroom and wrote this article on ‘Facilitating the Unknown’ in a Special Issue: Open Facilitator Stories, based on the amazing online course BYOD4L, and been involved in multiple weekly tweet-chats from/on LTHEchat.

And these are just the thing I can remember off the top of my head. Perhaps I should be more organised and keep better notes? Oh, and I still Sketchnote.

The great thing is that I have the interest and passion to do all this, all the time. I love being connected and in a position to collaborate or share knowledge and experience. I love that I can swap roles and identities so quickly depending on what the day brings – technical support, pedagogic support, management or administration, etc. No day is the same. No email asks for the same thing. No meeting covers the same thing (well, not very often).

Like Clare I find that IRL meetings can be awkward, conferences can be draining, events can be difficult to get everything done I want and see everyone I want to see AND still have time for the event itself. I’ve been reading the Quiet Revolution, about introverts, and engaging in their regular tweet chat. Having the time to reflect on events and conversations is important, and sometimes events can be so hectic there simply isn’t the time:

Oh, one final thing .. there’s always room for Lego! Pictures of Lego, actual Lego kits, or just talking about Lego.

Image source: clement127 (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

2015 Winter ALTC

Showcasing different approaches to building a #CMALT portfolio #ALTC

As part of the 2015 Winter ALTC Conference I am chairing a session on CMALT portfolios, and the creative ways to design and publish them.

This session will showcase three portfolios from recently accredited Certified Members, Elizabeth Charles (Birkbeck), David Watson (Hong Kong Polytechnic University) and Daniel Villalba Algas (Sheffield University). Facilitated by David Hopkins (Warwick Business School) we will focus on exploring different approaches to building CMALT portfolios and discuss how different job roles can be reflected.

In preparation for this event we’d appreciate your stories, experience, or progress on your journey to CMALT (on-going, completed, passed, failed, given up, etc.) by dropping a pin on our Padlet notice board.

If you have the time please join us online for the webinar Showcasing different approaches to building a CMALT portfolio – Wednesday December 9th, 2015, at 9:30AM.

Image source: ALT (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Reading List

Reading list: November 27th, 2015

Two weeks ago I posted a short list of a few of the more interesting articles or blog posts I’d been reading. I intend to keep this up, hopefully every fortnight (so it’s not too onerous for me to write or for you to read).

Here’s my second list:

I’ve also started reading the following books – both are well worth your attention!

  • Donald H Taylor: Webinar Master
    “A step-by-step guide to delivering compelling online presentations from a webinar expert and coach.”
  • Ed Catmull: Creativity Inc
    “Overcoming the unseen forces that stand in the way of true inspiration”

Image source: Bernal Saborio (CC BY-SA 2.0)

ALTC 2015

Gearing up for #ALTC 2015

So, with only two weeks to go before this years ALT conference (ALTC) it’s time to start making sense of the programme and sessions, see what’s happening and when, and then trying to work out how to be in several places at once.

So, after a first pass at the ALTC programme here are my plans, subject to change once I spend more time reading more of the abstracts and changing my mind. I think I may need to compare notes with someone who can get to some of the sessions I miss?  Continue reading

Interview with Sheila MacNeil and David Walker, #EdTechBook chapter authors

Interview with Sheila MacNeill and David Walker, #EdTechBook chapter authors

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this sixth post I talk to Sheila MacNeill (Senior Lecturer, Glasgow Caledonian University) and David Walker (Head of Technology Enhanced Learning, Sussex University), who have chosen to co-author a chapter for the book on Learning Technologists as ‘digital pedagogues’.

DH – Hi David and Sheila. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

SM – Good question. In reality, without using technology I wouldn’t be able to do my work. Almost everything I do at work relies on technology. Face to face communication is still very important, but I do all my “stuff” via technology, be that my desktop computer, my iPad or phone. If the “t’internet” is down at work I’m a bit stuffed! I would probably use up a months data allowance on my phone in a morning – or go home and work there. Luckily that doesn’t happen very often.  Continue reading

David Hopkins / Technology Enhanced Learning Blog

I need your vote – UK Blog Awards #UKBA15

I was very surprised to find I’ve been nominated for the UK Blog Awards, 2015!

Voting is open from Monday 10th November, 2014, until Monday 1st December, 2014.

I’ve been nominated in two categories, please be sure to click on the right link below for the right category you want .. or both ;-) (PS. they won’t add them together):

David Hopkins / Technology Enhanced Learning Blog
David Hopkins / Technology Enhanced Learning Blog

The next stage in the voting/judging process involves 20 finalists will be chosen to face an expert judging panel, with the winners being announced at an award ceremony in April 2015.

Please spend a minute voting for me (name and email needed), see if we can get recognition for a non-commercial, private, passionate, professional (motivational?), and self-hosted eLearning blog. Please also share this post and your vote on social media using the #UKBA15 and #BeBold tags.

Thank you.

Background – I started this blog in October 2008 more for my own interest, as somewhere I can write my own thoughts on things I find and read, and as somewhere I can refer back to. I had no notion of blogging itself, the community at large, and the world it opens up at that time, nor did I realise how influential I would find it in my professional development, reflection, or for other people who shared my love of all things ‘gadget technology + learning’. Whilst my interest and work takes up all aspects of eLearning, Learning Technolgoy, Education Technology, Technology Enhanced Learning, Mobile Learning, Personal Learning, Social Learning, etc. this blog is where I can explore more than just what I need for my day-to-day work – I can explore wider reading and journal activities, I can report on events, I can critique approaches and ideas that others propose. I can also just have a bit of fun and share something relevant but not necessarily ‘core’ to my role as a Learning Technologist or eLearning Consultant.

Interview with Sharon Flynn, #EdTechBook chapter author

Interview with Sharon Flynn, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this fifth post I talk to Sharon Flynn, Assistant Director at the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, National University of Ireland, Galway.

DH – Hi Sharon. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

SF – Almost everything I do, on a daily basis, is affected by technology. From the radio alarm waking me in the morning, the coffee machine that provides the kick to get me started, the always-on aspect of my mobile phone, the constant expectation of availability by email/phone during (and outwith) office hours, my almost constant presence on twitter, my new slow cooker that allows me plan family meals, through to the glorious availability of anything I want to watch on sky+, my day is mostly ruled by technology. And that’s before I get into the proper work aspects of technology for teaching and learning!  Continue reading

MOOCs

MOOCs – 9 points on what I like, and what I don’t

Over two years ago I wrote about a few experiences I’d had with some online courses / MOOCs, and why I ‘failed’ (according to the general headline figures of engagement, attendance, etc. that are used in mainstream press).

I want to revisit this, in light of more experience in both designing MOOCs and being a student on them.

Disclaimer: This is based on courses I’ve taken on the FutureLearn, Coursera, Cloudworks, EdX, and WordPress (OcTEL) platforms. I also highlight whether is was a student on the course, or part of the development team.

1. Comments and Engagement: For the most part I’ve been a silent students. This is both deliberate and accidental. Where it’s been a deliberate choice to not engage in the comments and discussion it’s been because I knew I didn’t have the time or inclination to trawl through the hundreds of fairly uninteresting posts to add my two-pennies worth or find the one nugget of insight that is worth anything. It’s also because, for some courses, I didn’t have enough interest to take my engagement further.

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave, Pt.3 #altc

‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ is the title & theme for the 2014 ALT Conference – my first ALT conference.

This post is the final in my ALTC journey for 2014, and covers the keynote from Audrey Watters and the final few sessions, and a general overview ‘think’.

My final sketchnotes for ALTC are below, for Audrey Watters’ keynote which, despite everything we’ve heard about so far in the conference did not talk about learning technology at all. What we had was a fantastic journey through literature and history looking at the origins of our relationship with change (in the form of technology) and how our relationships and perceptions of change or futures are based on the self, not on the tool.

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave, Pt.2 #altc

‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ is the title & theme for the 2014 ALT Conference – my first ALT conference – and my second post, this one about the second day.

Well, when I say second day the first day never really stopped – one downside of being connected and part of a massive PLN is that the tweets, emails, DMs, mentions, etc. don’t stop. At one point at the end of day 1 I had to just say enough, put the tablet & phone down (to charge) and then go charge my own batteries. For those who were staying on site and continued the party & chats, you are clearly younger than me!

Continue reading