Tag Archives: Education Technology

The NET Model of Social Leadership is built around three Dimensions: ‘Narrative’, ‘Engagement’ and ‘Technology’. The NET model is both an idea and a call to arms.

Book review: The Social Leadership Handbook @julianstodd

“What we know today will get us to tomorrow, but we’ll have to learn more again tomorrow to keep ahead … welcome to the Social Age, where change is constant and we live in constant beta.”

I’ve never thought about learning like this before, other than I know I get bored quickly so find new things to keep me engaged and entertained. But, with the constant bombardment of new technologies, new networks, new applications to old techniques, etc. we are indeed in ‘constant beta’.

And I mean ‘we’ in the context of learning professionals (which I’m exploring with my next book project: follow here for news -#EdTechBook) that we need to not only keep up with developments but somehow keep ahead of them. I know this is near impossible, but we can at least be proactive in how we approach the changes, reflect on our own experiences, and make suggestions and engage with each other (and the students). From this will come better understanding and a clearer picture of what could be used, how, where, why, and (importantly) by whom.  Continue reading

Luddites

Luddites #altc

Here’s what I learned last week … to call someone a Luddite, in the context of someone who is reluctant to be involved or get involved in technology, is wrong.

Hang on, back up a bit. At ALTC last week Audrey Watters spent a whole hour walking us through technology in history and literature without actually talking about technology at all. From Frankenstein’s monster to Luddites I learned more then than in any single History or literature lesson at school! Yes, really.

So, what’s wrong with Luddites? Well, nothing really, but it’s how we use the term when referring to colleagues who ‘fight’ against technological change or development. Audrey set all of us straight on this – the history of Luddites, and our use of the term, is far from fear of technology or technological change.

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave, Pt.3 #altc

‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ is the title & theme for the 2014 ALT Conference – my first ALT conference.

This post is the final in my ALTC journey for 2014, and covers the keynote from Audrey Watters and the final few sessions, and a general overview ‘think’.

My final sketchnotes for ALTC are below, for Audrey Watters’ keynote which, despite everything we’ve heard about so far in the conference did not talk about learning technology at all. What we had was a fantastic journey through literature and history looking at the origins of our relationship with change (in the form of technology) and how our relationships and perceptions of change or futures are based on the self, not on the tool.

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave, Pt.2 #altc

‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ is the title & theme for the 2014 ALT Conference – my first ALT conference – and my second post, this one about the second day.

Well, when I say second day the first day never really stopped – one downside of being connected and part of a massive PLN is that the tweets, emails, DMs, mentions, etc. don’t stop. At one point at the end of day 1 I had to just say enough, put the tablet & phone down (to charge) and then go charge my own batteries. For those who were staying on site and continued the party & chats, you are clearly younger than me!

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

Learning Technologist of the Year #altc #LTaward

The 2014 ALTC conference is the first I’ve attended in person, it’s one of the conferences I’ve wanted to get to since I started in this career. It’s also the first year I’ve been part of the Learning Technologist of the Year award. I am proud and honoured to be recognised, through the ‘highly commended’ LTOTY award, for my work.

  • This is Part 14 in my series where I am posting on my thoughts about being a Learning Technologist. This, and the previous posts, have been collected together with context and commentary into my eBook ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’

Many thanks to the award committee, to ALT, to those I’ve worked with, and those who I’ve had contact / tweets / conversations with over the years. Just so you’re in no doubt, I haven’t finished yet, there’s more to come from me … !

As part of the timetable for the ALT conference I was asked to present a short session to delegates on the LTOTY award, in support of the award. For me it’s all about the main/core attitudes we, LTs, need to have: confidence, communications, creative, curious, adaptable, relaxed, agreeable, humble, and above all, just be ready to take on all work, at all levels, to the best or your ability and recognise when you need to learn something new!

Here are my slides:

David Hopkins: 2014 Learning Technologist Of The Year Award #ALTC

As part of the award I also wrote an article for the ALT Newsletter, again highlighting my work and the award – I used the space to talk about the attitudes, work ethics, professionalism, etc. of LTs. You can read my ALT Newsletter article here.

And, just to prove it really did happen, he’s the photographic proof, thank you ALT:

ALTC CONFERENCE

Cover image credit: freepik.com

ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

Getting ready for #altc

The 2014 ALT Conference is just around the corner (in more than just time – it’s being held at the University of Warwick, which is where I now work!), and I’m getting ready for it.

The theme for this year (and my first ALTC) is ‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ , and the wave I’m trying to crest at the moment is planning the sessions and presentations I want to attend. It’s not helped by the fact so many of them are interesting, and that so many of them occur at the same time as each other.

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Here’s My eLearning Pet Peeve. What’s Yours?

Here’s my eLearning pet peeve. What’s yours?

Tom Khulmann, on the Rapid E-Learning Blog, regularly writes on techniques and tips for eLearning success. Recently he wrote about a discussion thread happening on the Articulate community site about pet peeves of eLearning professionals. In his reply he outlined not only some of the more recognisable pet peeves from the community (e.g. “the words ‘can you just’…?”) but his own personal favourite: locked course navigation.

Mine … well, the list is long and there isn’t one single thing that stands out from the rest, but if I had to name one pet peeve over all the others I’d say it was apathy. With the rate of change and advancements in technology there really is no excuse for the apathy that exudes from academic circles on the use or implementation of a ‘modern’ (read ‘up to date’) use of technology to enhance learning experiences.  Continue reading

'Dolly mixture' courses

Dolly Mixture courses

This week I had a great chat with @nancyrubin and @CliveBuckley after I re-tweeted Nancy:

Are Courses Outdated? MIT Considers Offering ‘Modules’ Instead

My thoughts on courses and training, as I mentioned above, as just this: courses tend to fit the organisational structure of the issuing body and don’t always fit the ‘need’ of the learner. You join (example) a specific school or faculty to start and complete your degree in Business Management or Economics or Sociology. But what if the specific subjects you really want to study are only loosely based around the course structure that the institution wants to teach? Continue reading

The Education of Tomorow

Infographic – The education of tomorrow

Infographics are great, when they have something worthwhile to say, and show the data in a worthwhile way. This is one of the better ones – The Education of Tomorrow.

Here are some of the headline details from the infographic:

  • 90% of college students and high school seniors (yes, another US centric dataset) see tablets as valuable educational tools.
  • 63% of college students and high school seniors believe tablets will transform the way college students learn in the future.
  • 60% of college students prefer digital formats when reading books inside or outside of class.
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Education and the Internet

Reading: Education and the Internet

The 2014 IGGY Junior Commission report on Education and the Internet is an important read. I’ve not had chance to digest all of it yet, but what I have read makes for some uncomfortable reading for Higher Education – take note: children understand the technology they have access to, the understand the possibilities (and challenge them), and know how they want to use it and bring it into all aspects of their lives, including learning / classroom / education.

“The IGGY Junior Commission enables ten of the brightest young minds to collaborate with one another to achieve a global goal. These young people are the potential leaders of the future and deserve an opportunity to share their views and recommendations.”

Research and interviews from 289 school children and 109 teachers from 14 different countries helped form the conclusions of the report which include:  Continue reading