Tag Archives: Education Technology

Interview with Rachel Challen, #EdTechBook chapter author

Interview with Rachel Challen, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a new series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this fourth post I talk to Rachel Challen, eLearning Manager at Loughborough College.

DH – Hi Rachel. When did you first realise that technology could have a positive effect on learning and teaching?

RC – I returned to education many years after I had first left, to do my PGCE at Wolverhampton University and did a module that was based on online resources. At that time we were only encouraged to develop PowerPoint presentations, but even so the opportunity with even the basic interactivity to engage students, blew my socks off. When I was at school, chalkboards were for dragging your fingernails down and board rubbers were for crowd control!  Continue reading

Interview with Peter Reed, #EdTechBook chapter author

Interview with Peter Reed, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a new series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this third post I talk to Peter Reed, Lecturer (Learning Technology) at the University of Liverpool.

DH – Hi Peter. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

PR: Massively. Beyond it being part of the day job, I use a variety of different tools and technologies to make my work more efficient and effective. I use things like Dropbox, Evernote and Mendeley a lot as they synchronise across my devices so I can access things whenever I need to. I see my use of these tools as part of my own little backpack or toolbox to call on. Interestingly the tools I use haven’t really changed much over the past 3 years or so, which I think is because I’m quite critical about new software/technologies when my existing workflows are effective for me personally. Ultimately, I think that’s a big part of being a Learning Technologist – rather than using tools/technologies for the sake of it, there’s some thought and critique to apply the right tools for the job.  Continue reading

Interview with Sue Beckingham, #EdTechBook chapter author

Interview with Sue Beckingham, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a new series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this first post I talk to Sue Beckingham, Educational Developer at Sheffield Hallam University.

DH – Hi Sue. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

SB – It’s an integral part of my daily routine. By this I mean that I make use of the affordances of my mobile phone to access a wide range of apps to help organise my day, provide me with news, information as part of my research and of course social networking places where I keep abreast of what’s happening out in the field via my personal learning network (PLN).  Continue reading

Old and New

What is an eBook?

Another innocuous tweet last night (below) led to another lengthy, and truly excellent, exchange on Twitter around the merits, format, value, and attitude of eBooks.

On the back of my tweet about my latest book project, The Really Useful #EdTechBook, I tweeted that I am disappointed at how little is written or published about, or by, technical or academic self-publishers:

It's disappointing how little is written about technical or academic #ebook self-publishing. Indicative of none happening? #EdTechBook

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TAGSExplorer / Martin Hawksey, FOTE14

Future of Technology in Education #FOTE14

This post is definately posted under ‘better late than never’!

I made a choice in 2013 to miss FOTE due to a couple of reasons, but I’m glad I went this year.

The line up this year seemed it was going to give me more of what I was looking for – education and technology, in a present/future perspective. I already knew what to expect from the likes of Steve Wheeler, James Clay, Miles Metcalfe, and David Coplin. The inclusion of the panel discussion would be an interesting concept, not one I’ve seen work well in a conference/event location before, and the start-up pitchfest.

Right from the start I wasn’t sure whether I’d tweet or sketchnote, or just sit and listen:

#FOTE14 - tweet, sketchnote, or listen?

In the end (actually, quite quickly) I was doing all three. Again! It seems I like the variety the different options gives me: I can engage in sharing and the backchannel on Twitter if I like (or not). I can sketch something that I either want to refer back to or investigate further, or not. Or I can enjoy the speaker and immerse myself in the experience, which or course I can do just as well when I’m doing all three.

To that, here are my sketches from the day:

#sketchnotes from #FOTE14

#sketchnotes from #FOTE14

Full size versions are available on Flickr: hopkinsdavid / Flickr

Also a huge thanks to Martin Hawksey (again) for his amazing TAGSExplorer archive. I’ve still to explore this amazing resource properly but if you click on an individuals name you can see all their individual tweets, replies, and mentions. The best bit, for me, is the ability to replay the interactions and conversations as a time-line, watching them enfold and grow. Click the image below to access TAGSExplorer and ‘play’.

TAGSExplorer / Martin Hawksey, FOTE14

The NET Model of Social Leadership is built around three Dimensions: ‘Narrative’, ‘Engagement’ and ‘Technology’. The NET model is both an idea and a call to arms.

Book review: The Social Leadership Handbook @julianstodd

“What we know today will get us to tomorrow, but we’ll have to learn more again tomorrow to keep ahead … welcome to the Social Age, where change is constant and we live in constant beta.”

I’ve never thought about learning like this before, other than I know I get bored quickly so find new things to keep me engaged and entertained. But, with the constant bombardment of new technologies, new networks, new applications to old techniques, etc. we are indeed in ‘constant beta’.

And I mean ‘we’ in the context of learning professionals (which I’m exploring with my next book project: follow here for news -#EdTechBook) that we need to not only keep up with developments but somehow keep ahead of them. I know this is near impossible, but we can at least be proactive in how we approach the changes, reflect on our own experiences, and make suggestions and engage with each other (and the students). From this will come better understanding and a clearer picture of what could be used, how, where, why, and (importantly) by whom.  Continue reading

Luddites

Luddites #altc

Here’s what I learned last week … to call someone a Luddite, in the context of someone who is reluctant to be involved or get involved in technology, is wrong.

Hang on, back up a bit. At ALTC last week Audrey Watters spent a whole hour walking us through technology in history and literature without actually talking about technology at all. From Frankenstein’s monster to Luddites I learned more then than in any single History or literature lesson at school! Yes, really.

So, what’s wrong with Luddites? Well, nothing really, but it’s how we use the term when referring to colleagues who ‘fight’ against technological change or development. Audrey set all of us straight on this – the history of Luddites, and our use of the term, is far from fear of technology or technological change.

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave, Pt.3 #altc

‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ is the title & theme for the 2014 ALT Conference – my first ALT conference.

This post is the final in my ALTC journey for 2014, and covers the keynote from Audrey Watters and the final few sessions, and a general overview ‘think’.

My final sketchnotes for ALTC are below, for Audrey Watters’ keynote which, despite everything we’ve heard about so far in the conference did not talk about learning technology at all. What we had was a fantastic journey through literature and history looking at the origins of our relationship with change (in the form of technology) and how our relationships and perceptions of change or futures are based on the self, not on the tool.

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave, Pt.2 #altc

‘Riding Giants: How to innovate and educate ahead of the wave’ is the title & theme for the 2014 ALT Conference – my first ALT conference – and my second post, this one about the second day.

Well, when I say second day the first day never really stopped – one downside of being connected and part of a massive PLN is that the tweets, emails, DMs, mentions, etc. don’t stop. At one point at the end of day 1 I had to just say enough, put the tablet & phone down (to charge) and then go charge my own batteries. For those who were staying on site and continued the party & chats, you are clearly younger than me!

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ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

Learning Technologist of the Year #altc #LTaward

The 2014 ALTC conference is the first I’ve attended in person, it’s one of the conferences I’ve wanted to get to since I started in this career. It’s also the first year I’ve been part of the Learning Technologist of the Year award. I am proud and honoured to be recognised, through the ‘highly commended’ LTOTY award, for my work.

  • This is Part 14 in my series where I am posting on my thoughts about being a Learning Technologist. This, and the previous posts, have been collected together with context and commentary into my eBook ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’

Many thanks to the award committee, to ALT, to those I’ve worked with, and those who I’ve had contact / tweets / conversations with over the years. Just so you’re in no doubt, I haven’t finished yet, there’s more to come from me … !

As part of the timetable for the ALT conference I was asked to present a short session to delegates on the LTOTY award, in support of the award. For me it’s all about the main/core attitudes we, LTs, need to have: confidence, communications, creative, curious, adaptable, relaxed, agreeable, humble, and above all, just be ready to take on all work, at all levels, to the best or your ability and recognise when you need to learn something new!

Here are my slides:

David Hopkins: 2014 Learning Technologist Of The Year Award #ALTC

As part of the award I also wrote an article for the ALT Newsletter, again highlighting my work and the award – I used the space to talk about the attitudes, work ethics, professionalism, etc. of LTs. You can read my ALT Newsletter article here.

And, just to prove it really did happen, he’s the photographic proof, thank you ALT:

ALTC CONFERENCE

Cover image credit: freepik.com