Tag Archives: eLearning

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 4: Collaboration, sharing, and ownership

Day four is upon us (going quickly, isn’t it!) and we’re looking at collaborating.

“We all need to work with other people and this is an opportunity to explore how smart devices can enable you to work with individuals and groups in a number of versatile ways so that you can maximise engagement and effectiveness when collaborating.”

For me collaboration starts with my network, my personal learning network, my learning environment … and here is how the tools I used) back in 2010: Continue reading

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 3: Curating, preserving, and adding value

Day three of the Bring Your Own Device for Learning #BYOD4L learning ‘architecture’ (I’m trying out some other terms for the course / module) was all about our curation of digital content.

Firstly, and before we get into the Twitter chat from last night .. curation can be defined as “maintaining, preserving and adding value to digital research data throughout its lifecycle.” (Digital Curation Centre).

The storify archive from the tweet chat last night is already available (thanks Sue and Chrissi again) and include some great chat and interesting questions on curation, including: Continue reading

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 2: Communicating, networking, and noise

Communication is big news. Unless you’re in the same room as the person you’re talking to you will be using some form of technology, whether it’s a home phone, mobile phone, computer (Skype, Instant Messenger or Chat, Google Hangouts, etc.) or a ‘new’ device like a tablet or smartphone(FaceTime, Skype, IM, etc.). But communication is now enhanced, and sometimes replaced, by social tools like Facebook, Twitter, blogging, commenting, even Instagram or Vine. What you use says as much about you as the tools you don’t.

So here, on day two of BYOD4L, the theme/topic makes us consider these different tools or techniques and our personal preferences for communicating. The Twitter chat posed some serious questions which was tweeted and discussed at length. How do we engage, how we want others to engage with us, and how we use these interactions is paramount to making those interactions matter.

We asked the following questions. Remember, each one was being tweeted to we were limited to 140 characters … well, more like 126 after you remove the ‘#BYOD4Lchat’ hashtag and ‘Q1′ and spaces, then drop another 30 or so for the ‘please use A1 and hashtag in your reply’ … so we only had about 80-90 characters to play with. Here’s what we asked:  Continue reading

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 1: Connecting, connections, and just a little bit of mild panic

Day one of the BYOD4L short course (we’re still discussing this: is it a short course, a course, a learning ecology? One thing we’re certain on … it’s certainly not a MOOC!) has been and gone. Well done everyone who engaged and ‘connected’ with the theme of connection.

Unfortunately, I didn’t. Part of me was busy and being pulled in different directions during the evening, and part of me was terrified of what I’d gotten myself into. A twitter chat is not for the feint of heart as it can be a full-on stressful and powerful thing (I’ve tried a few before and found myself overwhelmed and confused). I dipped in at various points and noted the quality and diversity of participation and participants, I looked at the Twitter map (thanks to Martin Hawksey again!) and was impressed at the variety of locations people were engaging and connecting from: well done!

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BYOD4L

Facilitating an online course #BYOD4L

With the short online course Bring Your Own Device for Learning (BYOD4L) starting next week I thought I’d start my own journey off with a short post about the process so far as a facilitator.

Taking part over five days it is certainly short, and there is no requirement or expectation for ‘student’s to engage in all of the five topics; do what you can, and when, seems to be the motto. The plan is a facilitator will engage and interact when requested or when each one feels the community needs direction. We’ll start the conversations and lead each theme but, as the remit of the whole course, the real direction will be steered and directed by the community need and experience.  Continue reading

The Really Useful eLearning Instruction Manual: Your toolkit for putting elearning into practice

Book Review: “The Really Useful eLearning Instruction Manual”

The Really Useful eLearning Instruction Manual: Your toolkit for putting elearning into practiceLate last year (2013) I started reading the latest offering from Rob Hubbard, “The Really Useful eLearning Instruction Manual”. A collection of chapters from leading and respected authors and educators this book offers the reader a “broad base of knowledge and the tools you need to navigate the eLearning terrain.”

The book is structured with well-defined chapters written by respected educators who lead their field, covering aspects of eLearning for synchronous and asynchronous delivery, internal- and externally-provided learning opportunities, and the differing platform and approaches to online / eLearning, including:

  • Jane Hart – informal and social learning
  • Charles Jennings – learning management
  • Ben Betts – games-based learning
  • Clive Shepherd – what is eLearning?
  • Julie Wedgewood – blended learning
  • Colin Steed – facilitating live online learning
  • Jane Bozarth – in-house, off-the-shelf, or outsourced eLearning?
  • Clark Quinn – mobile learning  Continue reading

Global Mobile Learning

Free Book on Mobile Learning Research #mLearning

Thanks to Inge Ignatia de Waard for pointing this out, this free ebook (well, PDF edition that looks like a book) on global mobile learning has some interesting research.

Global Mobile LearningThe highlights for me include subjects and research like:

  • State of Mobile Learning Around the World
  • Mobile Learning in International Development 
  • Planning for Mobile Learning Implementation 
  • Blended Mobile Learning: Expanding Learning Spaces with Mobile Technologies 
  • Mobile and Digital: Perspectives on Teaching and Learning in a Networked World 
  • Using mLearning and MOOCs to Understand Chaos, Emergence, and Complexity in Education 
  • Changing the Way of Learning: Mobile Learning in China 
  • Challenges for Successful Adoption of Mobile Learning 
  • Mobile Microblogging: Using Twitter and Mobile Devices in an Online Course to Promote Learning in Authentic Contexts 

Read it online here: ‘Global Mobile Learning Implementations and Trends’

Research in Learning Technology

Reading: “Pupil perspectives on using mobile devices for learning”

The advance of mobile devices into our everyday lives continues, and doesn’t look to falter any time soon (if at all).

As educators and facilitators we talk and plan and design and write about implementing and using these devices (phones, tablets, etc.) as either part of the learning process or as an ancillary device, something additional, to where we want the learning to take place. But are we taking the students’ needs and hopes and desires into account when we do this, or do we think we already know and plough ahead regardless?

As I said in the ‘Improving Learning with Mobile Technology’ eBook “If children are spending more and more time connected online, then it stands to reason that some of this time will be in class. In your class? What are you doing about it?”. This is why the article in Research in Learning Technology - ‘‘I don’t think I would be where I am right now’’. Pupil perspectives on using mobile devices for learning – is relevant and important … it highlights the students’ perspective in a comparison bet ween two academies where mobile devices are encouraged in one and banned in the other.

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21st Century Education: Thinking Creatively

Thinking Creatively

As part of my 2013 review I’ve been looking over some blogs and reports I read this year, and this one by Anthony Chivetta, whilst originally posted in 2008, still has so much impact today, some 5 years on – “21st Century Education: Thinking Creatively”

“Today’s world is no longer content with students who can simply apply the knowledge they learned in school: our generation will be asked to think and operate in ways that traditional education has not, and can not, prepare us for.” (Chivetta, 2008)

Just so you know, at the time of writing (Jan 2008) Anthony was 18 years old. We must also remember that in 2008 we didn’t have tablets like the iPad, we were still using desktops and laptops and netbooks, and we had only just received the first iPhone (June 2007). Yet this observant millennial had already seen the power and advantage a device like this could give a student, and that his teachers were lagging further and further behind their students.  Continue reading

Tapping Into Mobile Learning

Tapping into Mobile Learning

Another infographic, this time looking into how we can tap into mobile learning. Some figures from the infographic for you:

  • Only 17% of surveyed schools state that children are required to use mobile or portable devices in the classroom, and only 16% allow BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). Whether this is 16% of the previous 17% who allow the use of mobile devices or 16% of everyone surveyed is not clear.
  • Parents view the use of the use of mobile devices are used more effectively in early years classrooms to promote curiosity than in later years, but it is still significantly higher than for other uses, e.g. to foster creativity, to teach languages or reading.
  • Parents of children who are being encouraged to use mobile devices are more positive about the learning and educational potential of mobile learning. Notable differences in how parents view their child’s performance between those classrooms where mobile learning is required, to those where it is not, shows the biggest divide.
  • 2/3 or parents think schools should help students use devices safely.
  • 2/3 also agree that the very same mobile devices can distract children from learning.
  • Continue reading