Tag Archives: Flipped Classroom

Education and the Internet

Reading: Education and the Internet

The 2014 IGGY Junior Commission report on Education and the Internet is an important read. I’ve not had chance to digest all of it yet, but what I have read makes for some uncomfortable reading for Higher Education – take note: children understand the technology they have access to, the understand the possibilities (and challenge them), and know how they want to use it and bring it into all aspects of their lives, including learning / classroom / education.

“The IGGY Junior Commission enables ten of the brightest young minds to collaborate with one another to achieve a global goal. These young people are the potential leaders of the future and deserve an opportunity to share their views and recommendations.”

Research and interviews from 289 school children and 109 teachers from 14 different countries helped form the conclusions of the report which include:  Continue reading

Attendance vs Activity

Attendance vs Activity

The issue of teacher pay, pension, and working conditions is in the public arena again today as UK teachers go out on strike: “Thousands of pupils in England and Wales will miss lessons on Thursday as members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) walk out on strike.” – BBC News

And again the thorny issue of parents being fined when they take their children on holiday during term time is linked to the lost day(s) of teaching from the strike action -beautifully summed up in this News Thump (spoof news site) article: “As it is, when my child misses school I’m endangering their education and liable to a significant fine, but when they miss school due to a teacher’s strike it’s ‘in their best interests and helping their long-term future’.”

As someone who works in education, and a parent with children in early years schooling, I sympathise with both sides. But what I want to comment on is the issue of parents being able to take their children out of school for a family holiday during term time. I am sure that there are instances when it is not a good idea, e.g. before exams. But surely there’s something both the parents and the school can agree on for the benefit of the kids?   Continue reading

Utopia Classroom 2050

Classrooms in 2050

What will classrooms look like in 2050? Of course it’s easy to picture (!), haven’t you figured it out yet?

Yes, I know that I know nothing of this, which is why five leaders in their field were asked what they thought about it: what is the future of education? by Ariel Bogle.

This is what they think. As I read it (and please do so yourself on the link above) I got more and more annoyed. It was less and less about classrooms or learning in 2050 and more about ‘what’s happening now you think will have an impact in 30+ years time’. Only two, Naomi Davidson and Michael Gibson, seemed to truly look beyond the here-and-now projected education 36 years forward.

  • students will already be used to “interactive, engaging, live classes from anywhere they may happen to be, with the only requirement being a camera, a screen, and a wi-fi connection.”

Is this a warning? If we’re going to truly support engaged learners we need to get this done at the basic level to enable further change, connection, etc.
Continue reading

Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference 2014 BbTLC2014

Day 2: Blackboard T&L Conference #BbTLC2014

Day 2 of the 2014 Blackboard T&L Conference started with the usual Bb roadmap, which I’ll leave for others to cover.

As with the sessions I followed yesterday I’ve continued to sketchnote my way through them, making notes of the ideas and concepts rather than the specifics of the detail and data. Here are my day two sketches:

Dan Hewes: Flip your class with Blackboard Learn Continue reading

Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference 2014 BbTLC2014

Blackboard T&L Conference, Dublin #BbTLC2014

Next week is the 2014 Blackboard Teaching and Learning Conference in Dublin. The programme looks very comprehensive and has 6 streams in motion, which means it’s going to be very difficult to attend and cover all the sessions I want to attend – which means I’m going to have to be very selective about what, and who, I see.

Here’s my first impressions of what I will try and see –

Wednesday, April 30.

  • Keynote / Prof Stephen Heppell. I have met and talked with Prof Heppell on numerous occasions (at Learning Without Frontiers in 2011 and during my time working at Bournemouth University) and know that his unique perspective and style will make this keynote both interesting and hugely profound on the issues affecting education today. This is one session you do not want to miss.  Continue reading

Year in Review / 2013

Year in Review / 2013

Welcome to a final few thoughts on and about 2013: what did I do, what did I read, what did I achieve, what did I miss, what did I not do … you get the picture. Well …

  • After thinking, planning, and talking about it for nearly two years I finally got round to planning, writing, and publishing my eBook on QR Codes in Education. (May 2013).
  • Several years in the making I finally completed my CMALT portfolio and submitted it and gained my CMALT accreditation (November 2013).
  • In October I re-read my QR Codes in Education eBook and realised it would read better with a different structure to the contents and I took the opportunity to make it available as a printed book too (November 2013). Working with the CreateSpace website I restructured the materials, redesigned the cover and worked on the 2nd edition of the book (also updating the eBook too to match).
  • Worked closely with colleagues in Leicester on aspects of mobile learning, online marking and feedback, support, course reconfiguration, and roles & responsibilities.
  • Presented a brown bag lunch seminar on “Improving the Student Experience Through Blackboard in the College of Social Science”
  • I am proud to have helped launch the East Midlands Learning Technology SIG including Twitter, blog, LinkedIn group, Google+ group, etc.

Most popular posts (by month):  Continue reading

Flipped Classroom Field Guide, Derek Bruff

Field Guide for the Flipped Classroom

With the new academic year upon us I regularly hear and read about the flipped classroom, and how people are going to use it. I was disheartened to read from Alan Cann (@AJCann) in his “Condensed Milk And The Flipped Classroom” post that his lengthy preparation for a flipped approach was not going to taken forward and implemented. While Alan is already planning an alternative approach, no doubt using techniques and technology he’s already invested a great deal of time in, the  post he referenced on The Atlantic website (“The Condensed Classroom”) had this great image.

For first-timers who want to understand the flipped classroom approach, this is an ideal introduction:  Continue reading

Facebook Guide for Educators: A tool for teaching and learning

Facebook Guide for Educators

Facebook Guide for Educators: A tool for teaching and learningThis guide, written in collaboration with many organisations including Apps For Good and the Gates Foundation, is “aimed at educators working with young people within schools, colleges, universities, work based learning, formal and informal learning settings.”

“The guide aims to be practical and hands on, but is not exhaustive. Innovative uses of Facebook are being developed all of the time and as such we have created a Facebook for Educators Page run by educators for educators, to share their experiences and recommendations across the UK and beyond.”

By looking at how Facebook is already being used it reports on how it could be used to

  • support subject teaching across the curriculum,
  • support out of school hours learning,
  • encourage informal social learning,
  • enable easy communication between students, teachers and parents, and to
  • support the development of digital citizenship skills  Continue reading

video

Using video: from passive viewing to active learning

videoEmily Moore has written this great introduction in the Faculty Focus: online magazine: “From Passive Viewing to Active Learning: Simple Techniques for Applying Active Learning Strategies to Online Course Videos”. Please read the original as it covers more in depth use of video, but my highlights of the piece are below.

Video as a guided lesson (flipping the classroom?): “The goal here is to help ensure that students watch videos actively—in other words, giving it their full attention. You also want to help draw students’ attention to (and reinforce) the most important concepts being presented.”

  • Pose a question at the beginning of each video to give students an idea before they watch of what to expect, what to look for, and what might be worth thinking about.
  • Present videos in an outline-like structure using concise, descriptively labeled links that include running times as shown below.
  • Embed short graded or self-assessments either in the video itself, or at the end of each video.

Video as springboard for in-depth discussion: Continue reading

The Classroom of Tomorrow #edtech

I just saw this video and wanted to share it … but also to criticise it, sorry.

YouTube: The Classroom of Tomorrow

On the face of it it’s a good and well presented demonstration about how mobile or modern technology can be used in classrooms .. but this is what disappointed me:

  • The student at the start is using his device in the classroom. While this is obviously the point of the video I would have thought that the classroom of tomorrow has no walls, no boundaries – so this student could have been anywhere (school, library, friends house, cafe, home, gym, bus-stop, beach, car, etc.).
  • The students in the gym are doing nothing and looking bored while their instructor works something out on his phone. A good instructor would have had them warming up or doing something before getting the device out, and not let them sit around?
  • Continue reading