Tag Archives: Learning Objects

12

12 ways teachers are using social media in the classroom

This resource from Vicki Davis – “A Guidebook for Social Media in the Classroom” on Edutopia is a good starting point for planning the inclusion of social media in learning spaces.

Vicki closes by saying something very similar to what I submitted to the Mobile Learning – “Improving Learning with Mobile Technology” eBook:

“Social media is here. It’s just another resource and doesn’t have to be a distraction from learning objectives. Social media is another tool that you can use to make your classroom more engaging, relevant and culturally diverse.”

The list consists of:

  1. Tweet or post status updates as a class.
  2. Write blog posts about what students are learning.
  3. Let your students write for the world.
  4. Connect to other classrooms through social media.
  5. Use Facebook to get feedback for your students’ online science fair projects.
  6. Use YouTube for your students to host a show or a podcast.
  7. Create Twitter accounts for a special interest projects.
  8. Ask questions to engage your students in authentic learning.
  9. Communicate with other classrooms.
  10. Create projects with other teachers.
  11. Share your learning with the world.
  12. Further a cause that you care about.

What would you add (or remove) from the list to help others utilise students and their devices?

Image source: Life on the wire (CC BY 2.0)

SIgnpost

Know when to keep it simple

When it comes to developing materials and learning resources for your course, I think it’s important to know when to keep it simple.

We have all seen examples, or know of some, where every possible bell-and-whistle has been applied, in good intention, but the final result has made the course complicated and heavy.

Here are a few tips on how, and why, to keep it simple, which apply as much to online distance learning courses as well as campus courses:

  • Signpost: provide little ‘signposts’ to learning resources, assignment details, marking criteria, timetables, etc. to help the student. The larger the course or course materials then the more complicated the course structure could be, and the more lost a students will find themselves in your course.  Continue reading

#durbbu

Blackboard Users Conference #durbbu: Blackboard Roadmap and The Challenges Ahead

Durham Blackboard Users ConferenceDay two of the Durham Blackboard Users’ Conference started with this extremely useful insight into the roadmap Blackboard is taking with the ‘Learn’ product, as well as Blackboard’s own opinion on the conference theme: “Make Do or Spend?”.

Greg Ritter (@gritter), Director of Product Management with Blackboard Learn, showed Blackboards perspective on ‘the challenges ahead’ and on the conference theme, ‘Make Do or Spend?’. Greg showed us, and discussed:

  • Blackboard Analytics [product]: extract student data, from both Blackboard and Institution student-records systems, for use in reporting to different stakeholders.
  • Focus on fundamentals, 2010 to 2012:

Focus On Fundamentals (Bb 2010-2012) Continue reading

Creative Commons

Creative Commons Infographic: Licenses Explained

Do you use images or photos? Do you check with the owner before saving or copying or using? Are you using Creative Commons (CC) images and think that it’s all OK because the image labelled as CC therefore you’ve done all your supposed to?

Do you in fact understand what Creative Commons is? If in doubt, before you go any further, watch this video: Creative Commons Explained.

Right, so you understand CC now? Then you’ll also be needing this Infographic: “Creative Commons: free photos for bloggers“:

Creative Commons
Click to view full Infographic

A photo or image placed under a Creative Commons license enables you, the ‘borrower’ to copy, distribute, and display the work providing the photo or image is correctly attributed to the owner. Every CC license applies worldwide, is non-revocable, is not exclusive, and lasts for the duration of the works copyright.

Continue reading

Newspaper Headline

Custom Newspaper Headlines for your Learning Resources

Get a nice little image like this for your eLearning resources, made up of your own content from this website: www.fodey.com/generators/newspaper/.

Here’s one I made earlier from the introduction to my recent “What is a Learning Technologist (part 8)” post.

Newspaper Headline

Whilst it doesn’t generate an image that’s nearly big enough to showcase any meaningful content it could be a well placed and personalised image to introduce a new section of your learning resources, or part of a montage of images / clippings for a class review, or a unique image for your next PowerPoint presentation? How would you use this?

Simply input your Newspaper name, publication date, and article title as well as the main text you want the generator to use and then press the ‘Generate’ button, like this:

Create Newspaper Headlines

Google Earth

Obvious, but Underrated Application for the Classroom; Google Earth

I have used Google Earth a few times in some eLearning packages I’ve put together, mainly to demonstrate location or distance, but what else is it useful for? Well, that all depends on what age of student you have, and what you want them to achieve in the activity.

I came across this excellent list of uses for Google Earth in Education, and a great list of 50 Ideas for the Classroom.

The post starts by saying:

“Google Earth has opened up potential for students in classrooms around the globe with its bird’s-eye view of the world. Whether you are a veteran teacher looking for new ways to teach old topics or you are a still an education student getting ready to make your debut in the classroom, these exciting ways to use Google Earth are sure to infuse your lessons with plenty of punch.”

I’ll not replicate the article here, so you’ll have to click the link above for the full list (split into the different age ranges of students) but here are a few choice activities for the different ages, from Primary to higher education;

If your new to Google Earth and want to know more, then you ought to read a few websites that are good at introducing the application and it’s uses. A few to start you off are;

Of course you’ll need to have Google Earth installed first – it’s free and available here. Another really good tool to use is the browser plugin – Google Earth API – which lets you “embed Google Earth, a true 3D digital globe, into your web pages. Using the API you can draw markers and lines, drape images over the terrain, add 3D models, or load KML files, allowing you to build sophisticated 3D map applications.”

If you’ve used Google Earth yourself and would like to share your experience, and even the activity you used it in, then please leave a comment.

Image source.