Tag Archives: LinkedIn

Terms and conditions may apply

Terms and Conditions May Apply

If you’ve not heard about the film ‘Terms and Conditions May Apply’ then you ought to go look it up. Better still, go watch it (it’s currently on Netflix, and probably elsewhere on the web in full too). Here’s the trailer:

YouTube: Terms and Conditions May Apply

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Open Badges - LinkedIn Profile

How to: Display Open Badges on your LinkedIn profile

Here’s a short ‘how to’ guide on displaying your Open Badges, or a Mozilla backpack, on your LinkedIn profile.

There’s the simple way, which is not very visual or appealing, which is to edit your profile and use one of the three links available under ‘contact info’, which will display on your public profile like this:

Open Badges - LinkedIn ProfileI don’t know about you, but that doesn’t really do it for me. You?

  • This post has been updated to show how to display badges from either a Mozilla backpack or the Cred.ly website.

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Twitter: hopkinsdavid / David Hopkins

Where would I be without Twitter?

[Read this next bit as though it’s a well known Sinead O’Conner song]

It’s been 5 years, 30 days, and 53 minutes since my first tweet. Here is it:

Twitter: hopkinsdavid / David Hopkins

In that 5 years, 30 days, etc. I’ve made nearly 25,000 tweets. Admittedly not all of them are relevant, interesting, insightful, funny, or worth repeating, but some of them have been. Some of them have been ideas, sharing, conversations, photos, jokes, people I’ve met or places I’ve been, books or journals I’ve read, etc. Some are re-tweets (RT), mentions, replies, etc. And some are just banal observations for no other reason than Twitter was available and somewhere I can put a random thought, observation, rant, or other piece of useless information.  Continue reading

JISC Legal

Social Media for Staff: Legal Checklist

This is a great reference guide, from JISC Legal,  for universities, colleges and learning providers to consider in relation to social media use by staff.  The aim of the checklist is to ensure risks are recognised and managed appropriately, while clarifying for staff what the boundaries are.

JISC LegalDownload here: Social Media for Staff: Legal Checklist

It includes items such as:

  • The institution has a clear strategy which reflects its approach to risk.
  • A social media policy makes staff aware of their responsibilities, and defines social media broadly to include new technologies and mobile devices.
  • The policy clarifies where ‘professional’ ends and ‘private’ begins, and makes clear what constitutes ‘unacceptable use’
  • Staff are aware what is required prior to posting relevant content e.g. an appropriate disclaimer or appropriate authorisation.

For more information, including links to other resources, visit jiscleg.al/socialmedia

So, does your institution / employer have any of these in place? If so please drop a comment and link below and share.

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 3: Curating, preserving, and adding value

Day three of the Bring Your Own Device for Learning #BYOD4L learning ‘architecture’ (I’m trying out some other terms for the course / module) was all about our curation of digital content.

Firstly, and before we get into the Twitter chat from last night .. curation can be defined as “maintaining, preserving and adding value to digital research data throughout its lifecycle.” (Digital Curation Centre).

The storify archive from the tweet chat last night is already available (thanks Sue and Chrissi again) and include some great chat and interesting questions on curation, including: Continue reading

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 2: Communicating, networking, and noise

Communication is big news. Unless you’re in the same room as the person you’re talking to you will be using some form of technology, whether it’s a home phone, mobile phone, computer (Skype, Instant Messenger or Chat, Google Hangouts, etc.) or a ‘new’ device like a tablet or smartphone(FaceTime, Skype, IM, etc.). But communication is now enhanced, and sometimes replaced, by social tools like Facebook, Twitter, blogging, commenting, even Instagram or Vine. What you use says as much about you as the tools you don’t.

So here, on day two of BYOD4L, the theme/topic makes us consider these different tools or techniques and our personal preferences for communicating. The Twitter chat posed some serious questions which was tweeted and discussed at length. How do we engage, how we want others to engage with us, and how we use these interactions is paramount to making those interactions matter.

We asked the following questions. Remember, each one was being tweeted to we were limited to 140 characters … well, more like 126 after you remove the ‘#BYOD4Lchat’ hashtag and ‘Q1′ and spaces, then drop another 30 or so for the ‘please use A1 and hashtag in your reply’ … so we only had about 80-90 characters to play with. Here’s what we asked:  Continue reading

BYOD4L

#BYOD4L Day 1: Connecting, connections, and just a little bit of mild panic

Day one of the BYOD4L short course (we’re still discussing this: is it a short course, a course, a learning ecology? One thing we’re certain on … it’s certainly not a MOOC!) has been and gone. Well done everyone who engaged and ‘connected’ with the theme of connection.

Unfortunately, I didn’t. Part of me was busy and being pulled in different directions during the evening, and part of me was terrified of what I’d gotten myself into. A twitter chat is not for the feint of heart as it can be a full-on stressful and powerful thing (I’ve tried a few before and found myself overwhelmed and confused). I dipped in at various points and noted the quality and diversity of participation and participants, I looked at the Twitter map (thanks to Martin Hawksey again!) and was impressed at the variety of locations people were engaging and connecting from: well done!

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BYOD4L

Facilitating an online course #BYOD4L

With the short online course Bring Your Own Device for Learning (BYOD4L) starting next week I thought I’d start my own journey off with a short post about the process so far as a facilitator.

Taking part over five days it is certainly short, and there is no requirement or expectation for ‘student’s to engage in all of the five topics; do what you can, and when, seems to be the motto. The plan is a facilitator will engage and interact when requested or when each one feels the community needs direction. We’ll start the conversations and lead each theme but, as the remit of the whole course, the real direction will be steered and directed by the community need and experience.  Continue reading

Online Branding for Academics

Online Branding for Academics

Every so often I’ll have a discussion with an academic around “this facebook thing” or “what’s the point of Twitter”. Each time it’s for a different reason or coming from a different perspective or background. But each time it also comes down to two main areas of interest: time and effort. How long will it take or how much effort will they need to put into it for it to become a worthwhile enterprise.

I always say it will come down to what they want to get from the experience. Do they want to get hits or recognition, do they want to build a social profile and/or ‘digital footprint’? Do they want to manage or improve an existing profile or footprint, or eradicate a negative one? Is it to be able to connect with colleagues and peers through LinkedIn or Google+, or to increase conference speaking requests? Is the reason for signing up to Facebook or Twitter for student engagement or because you can only really understand how the students use it if you use it yourself? Is their need to be ‘there’ one of inclusion or monitoring? Often the reason is just one where they see someone else using it, probably successfully, and therefore “want some of that”.

In most cases it is nearly always ‘some of the above’, and in very few cases ‘all of the above’ (even if it’s not acknowledged to be this). I can’t say “you should start here … ” as each person should start where it is more appropriate: LinkedIn for professional reputation, SlideShare for conference and/or learning resources, Google+ or Twitter for networks and Personal Learning Networks (PLN), etc.   Continue reading

What is a Learning Technologist? eBook

I’ve been certified! #CMALT

David HopkinsAfter an awfully long time I have written, submitted, re-written, re-submitted, and finally been awarded the status of Certified Member of the Association for Learning Technology (CMALT). When I say it took a long time, it’s not an understatement – here’s how and why.

  • This is the twelfth part in my series of ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’ I have collected the series to date in a downloadable eBook – an update will be submitted to the online stores very shortly.

CMALT – The beginning
I joined Bournemouth University (BU) in 2007, fresh into the role of a Learning Technologist (LT) from 10 years as a commercial web designer. In all honesty I didn’t really know much of what I’d be expected to do but I knew my experience with online communities and techniques in developing and fostering them was key to my appointment. It just goes to show the faith and vision my interviewers had to see me for my potential and offer me the job! I joined ALT shortly after starting, which is where I first heard about CMALT.  Continue reading