Tag Archives: Network

Network Fluency (@jaycross‎)

Thanks to Jay Cross for this short and sweet 2 minute video on ‘Network Fluency’. With the Internet and the connections we make through it we have enabled ourselves and our learning to take a new level.

“Connections begat connections. Soon everything was connected to everything else. A parallel universe sprang up alongside society, the Internet became an integral part of business and leisure: those who weren’t fluent and using the ‘net were marginalised. Not only that but everything happened faster and faster and you were required to proclaim your ‘network identity’ and figure out what you were going to do. And what you’re going to do is become fluent in the way networks work.”

Jay goes on to highlight three main areas where we need to be to become ‘fluent’: making sense of stuff, giving back, collaboration, and connection.

YouTube: Network Fluency / Jay Cross

What is a Learning Technologist? eBook

I’ve been certified! #CMALT

David HopkinsAfter an awfully long time I have written, submitted, re-written, re-submitted, and finally been awarded the status of Certified Member of the Association for Learning Technology (CMALT). When I say it took a long time, it’s not an understatement – here’s how and why.

  • This is the twelfth part in my series of ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’ I have collected the series to date in a downloadable eBook – an update will be submitted to the online stores very shortly.

CMALT – The beginning
I joined Bournemouth University (BU) in 2007, fresh into the role of a Learning Technologist (LT) from 10 years as a commercial web designer. In all honesty I didn’t really know much of what I’d be expected to do but I knew my experience with online communities and techniques in developing and fostering them was key to my appointment. It just goes to show the faith and vision my interviewers had to see me for my potential and offer me the job! I joined ALT shortly after starting, which is where I first heard about CMALT.  Continue reading

The Connected Age

Learning Technology at the core of The Connected Age? #LTHE

Enjoy this video from Educause. I hope you can see where I am coming from and why I’ve added this video to the #LTHE project as I see the Learning Technologist as an enabler, facilitator, manager, specialist, and even student in these ‘connected age’ Education settings:

“Higher Education is a connected community, and connections can do transformative things. When education is connected it forms a pathway; formal and informal learning are no longer separated. Learners can connect to an ever-widening circle of mentors, peers, experience, knowledge, games, simulations, collaborations tools, and augmented reality can help learners connect the dots in ways never before possible.”

The Connected Age from Educause on Vimeo.

Twitter David Hopkins

Twitter, updated

Twitter David Hopkins

I have been on Twitter for nearly 5 years now, using my @hopkinsdavid handle/username.

In this time I’ve amassed nearly 6700 followers and am currently following just over 1300 accounts – I don’t call them people as some are ‘corporate’ or ‘organisational’ accounts. Many of those I do follow are individuals who are like me and are working in some form of education, as either learning technologists, instructional designers, etc. or are thought leaders, provokers, or game-changers who investigate and challenge the educational establishments to improve ourselves and the world we’re leaving the next generation.

Continue reading

gplus.to - Google+

Google+ shortened

Thanks to Sue Beckingham (again) I now have a natty shortened URL for my Google+ account. Using GPlus.to website you can create a nickname and have a shortened web address for what is, let’s face it, a fairly unfriendly and unmemorable G+ web address.

gplus.to - Google+

Which would you rather use / show on a profile page or business card?

Yeah, thought so, and by signing in to the website using your Google account you can get (basic) statistics on the use of your URL.

Unhappy

What is a Learning Technologist (part 9): Ignorance is bliss?

UnhappyThe more I think, the more I learn. The more I learn, the more I question. The more I question, the more I find I don’t know. The more I want to know, the more I question, well, everything, and the unhappier I become.

Why is this? Shouldn’t I be happier with more knowledge, more detail, a better understanding of who I am and the world I live in? Shouldn’t this mean I am better placed to affect and effect change in my life, my family, my work, my finances, my home, my health, etc.?

  • This is part 9 in my series of ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’ Read Part 8 here, and follow the links on my About page to the other parts.

I was never ‘encouraged’ to think at school – we had our notes dictated to us and we were told what to learn for the tests. I was ‘average’ in exams (and that’s being generous), and just about scraped in to and through University. Even after 4 years there I never really thought much about what I was doing, I just went with the flow, just happy to pass and move on. It wasn’t until 2007 and working at Bournemouth University that I started to question what I wanted to be, who I wanted to be, and how I wanted to get there. It wasn’t some profound personal journey, it was just the environment I worked in .. Continue reading

OCTEL: Open Course in Technology Enhanced Learning

Open Course in Technology Enhanced Learning #ocTEL

“Poor use of technology is a significant waster of time and money in the public sector. UK Higher Education is not exempt from this problem. This course will help those planning and delivering teaching in HE to make the best use of technology in their work and avoid pitfalls and hiccups.”

OCTEL: Open Course in Technology Enhanced LearningI’ve just signed up for yet another MOOC, this one provided by ALT (the Association for Learning Technology) called the “Open Course in Technology Enhanced Learning”.

Starting in April 2013, and running for 10 weeks, the online course will “help those planning and delivering teaching in HE to make the best use of technology in their work and avoid pitfalls and hiccups”.

  • You can follow the course, and the run up to it, on Twitter with the hashtag #ocTEL and Twitter account @ALTocTEL

The course will cover aspects of (and is not limited to … nor is it finalised yet either):

  • Induction: how this course works, who can help
  • Openness and standards
  • Options for the material, sizing effort, lead times, hardware and software needs, costs
  • On line assessment
  • Accessibility
  • Students in transition between sectors
  • Environments and administration
  • Using social media and games
  • Continue reading

#durbbu

Blackboard Users Conference #durbbu: The Learning Ecology

Durham Blackboard Users ConferenceAfter several years of trying to get the UK Blackboard Users Conference it seems 2013 (and the 13th conference – it’s a teenager!) is my lucky year. The theme for the 13th Annual Durham Blackboard Users’ Conference is ‘Make Do or Spend’ with presentations looking at how colleges and universities are responding to pressure:

  • Increasing consumerist attitudes amongst students, and
  • Severe fiscal constraints.

What I hope to get from the 2 day conference, apart from the networking, product/Blackboard development, Bb mobile progress, conference dinner, travel, etc., is insight into how individuals and Institutions are dealing with, and adapting, to the changing conditions within the UK FE/HE market. How are these changes are affecting approaches to learning management systems (Blackboard) and can these changes be sustained or modified if the conditions ‘worsen’? Continue reading

Your Professional Profile

What is your ‘professional profile? How do you ensure you keep your online profile, your ‘digital footprint’, consistent and professional, your contact list up to date with you career, growing your network of influence whilst keeping your skill base and research activities up to date and relevant? One way is with with LinkedIn:

YouTube: What is LinkedIn?

Whether you are actively looking for work, passively looking for a new challenge or not, doesn’t matter, your LinkedIn profile is being found and searched, it is being used to form an opinion of you, and it could (should) be working for you in your absence.

When was the last time you looked at your own profile critically, and what did you think – is it an accurate representation that you are happy with? If not then go and do something about it.

If, like me, you have put some effort into your profile (David Hopkins on LinkedIn) and are reasonably happy with it, then there is always room for a little improvement, and you will like this post by Sue Beckingham ‘How to Network Professionally Online‘.

PS: I’m always happy to share and connect online, just use the little Social Media icons to the right to see the different networks I’m active on including Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.

Quip

‘Quip’ for Twitter App

‘Quip’ (iPad) is a new and different (visual) way to view and interact with your Twitter network (in my case my personal learning network / PLN).

I have been using the official Twitter app on the iPad and iPhone for a long time now out of choice as nothing has really come my that feels ‘better’ (but their penchance to crash so frequently has caused me to look around from time to time). Quip was introduced through a tweet from Mark Power (@markpower), and Quip is all about the conversation:

“Imagine trying to follow a conversation in real life if the group of people involved all spoke backwards while others nearby kept interrupting with random comments. It sounds crazy but that’s what it can often be like when scanning a normal Twitter timeline. With Quip, replies show their context right where they are. You don’t have to chase conversations down or drill down away from the timeline because Quip groups them by default and puts them the right way around for you.”

Quip (£0.69) : http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/quip/id501870713

The Next Web recently wrote a good review of the App – The gorgeous iPad app that made me enjoy reading Twitter again - with the notable highlights explaining the subtle features of the app:

  • The timeline view you’re presented with allows you to scroll through your recent history, with a quick scroll on right letting you buzz through faster. That quick scroll can be locked away, but it serves the dual function of highlighting your new tweets in blue, so you can see where you left off.
  • To view a conversation surrounding any tweet in your timeline, tap and hold on the large profile picture. Quip will go out and find all of the replies, then reshuffle the conversation to make sure you see the originating tweet first. Then you can tap anywhere below the tweet to expand that conversation and read it.
  • The next tab down lets you see only conversations, but the ‘find all bits of this’ shortcut still works to gather and sort them all. This is really the core section of Quip, as it lets you browse discussions around ideas, rather than a disjointed feed of tweets.
  • Further on down you have access to a stream that just displays the images culled from your feed. This provides you with a pure pictographic tour of your timeline, isolated from all of the chatter.

The piece closes with what I’ve already realised, that Quip could never “be my primary Twitter client. I’m too much of an information addict and I’m tied to my stream throughout the day. But it has given me a different way to read Twitter, a more coherent way that gives it the ‘lean-back’ feel that no other client has.”

What and how do you read and interact with Twitter, what’s your favourite app or method?