Tag Archives: Social Network

Digital distraction

Digital Distraction

“The mere presence of a cell or smartphone on the table can disengage people during in-person conversations and hinder their empathy, according to a new Virginia Tech study that finds your attention is divided even if you’re not actively looking at your phone.”

The article ‘Your smartphone could be turning you into a lousy friend – even when you’re not using it‘ is as much about the social impact of the always-on connections we have through our mobile devices as it is about how we manage them.

“For many, digital distraction involves the “constant urge to seek out information, check for communication and direct their thoughts to other people and worlds,” the authors write.”

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Necklace

‘Anyone who doesn’t love Twitter is an idiot’

These are not my words (although I may agree with them)!

In February I wrote about my experience of Twitter and how it has changed the way I work, think, and look at myself – Where would I be without Twitter. In it I looked back over 5 years, 24,000 tweets, +7000 followers, etc. I acknowledge it’s impact on my personal and professional outlook, some good and some not so good.

Dan Snow, the presenter and historian has gone further than me and pinned his thoughts on the use of Twitter in The Guardian article
‘Anyone who doesn’t love Twitter is an idiot’. Dan explains that, for him, the use of the Internet (including Twitter and other social tools) has brought otherwise lengthy or geographically inaccessible primary sources into easy access:

“Digitisation of archives means we can search records and primary source material from the comfort of our own offices … a perk of the job used to be that you could travel abroad and work in an archive somewhere quite glamorous for weeks on end. Now we stay at home and do it online. For me, though, even more exciting is how it has allowed us to reach out to people. It’s made history collaborative and accessible. I can tweet about what I’m working on, and people will suggest ideas or come up with documents. It has opened a pipeline between geeky history people like me and the rest of the world. We used to just publish in academic journals, now we can share our research with huge numbers of people.”

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Open Badges - LinkedIn Profile

How to: Display Open Badges on your LinkedIn profile

Here’s a short ‘how to’ guide on displaying your Open Badges, or a Mozilla backpack, on your LinkedIn profile.

There’s the simple way, which is not very visual or appealing, which is to edit your profile and use one of the three links available under ‘contact info’, which will display on your public profile like this:

Open Badges - LinkedIn ProfileI don’t know about you, but that doesn’t really do it for me. You?

  • This post has been updated to show how to display badges from either a Mozilla backpack or the Cred.ly website.

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Create the Digital Image You Want

Create the digital image you want

Whether you use the term digital footprint or digital image social identity or online profile or some variant, there is much discussion on and around how we portray ourselves online, and how those who access that see us.

It is even more important (to me: I have two young boys who will one day want to be active online) to make sure we inform and guide anyone new to this kind of activity and to putting themselves online (not just children or students, but anyone of any age) – what, how, where, why, etc. It is as important to demonstrate how to do it as much as how not to do it, and why we do something and why we don’t.

There are plenty of examples of online behaviour causing a great deal of personal tragedy or loss – I presented about it a few years ago. What I have learned since then is there are so many people doing some great work in this to help people of all ages find their place and voice online, safely. Lisa Nielson posted this week on some great work by the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) who worked with students, parents, and teachers to formulate their guidelines for social media use.  Continue reading

The Internet (in real-time) Infographic

We all love infographics (well, I do. Well, decent ones anyway) which is why this one is really interesting. Instead of being a static “this is what happens in an Internet-minute” like this one and this one) you can see the number of posts, likes, tweets, pins, emails, views, downloads, clicks, saves, etc. build over the time it takes you to view the details of the infographic.


Click image to open interactive version (via Penny Stocks Lab).

Social Media Landscape

Social media for engagement #jiscinform

Whilst reading the excellent JISC Inform newsletter (I’ve not paid this enough attention in the past – I will from now on!) I read the article on ‘social media for engagement’. Go read it now!

“The role of social media has the potential to extend beyond learning and teaching to support student engagement in the broadest sense. It offers a new way to develop relationships between the student or learner and their institution, as well as an alternative means to raise awareness of an institution’s engagement efforts.”  Continue reading

12

12 ways teachers are using social media in the classroom

This resource from Vicki Davis – “A Guidebook for Social Media in the Classroom” on Edutopia is a good starting point for planning the inclusion of social media in learning spaces.

Vicki closes by saying something very similar to what I submitted to the Mobile Learning – “Improving Learning with Mobile Technology” eBook:

“Social media is here. It’s just another resource and doesn’t have to be a distraction from learning objectives. Social media is another tool that you can use to make your classroom more engaging, relevant and culturally diverse.”

The list consists of:

  1. Tweet or post status updates as a class.
  2. Write blog posts about what students are learning.
  3. Let your students write for the world.
  4. Connect to other classrooms through social media.
  5. Use Facebook to get feedback for your students’ online science fair projects.
  6. Use YouTube for your students to host a show or a podcast.
  7. Create Twitter accounts for a special interest projects.
  8. Ask questions to engage your students in authentic learning.
  9. Communicate with other classrooms.
  10. Create projects with other teachers.
  11. Share your learning with the world.
  12. Further a cause that you care about.

What would you add (or remove) from the list to help others utilise students and their devices?

Image source: Life on the wire (CC BY 2.0)

“I share, therefore I am”

Here’s a great video for this Friday afternoon: ‘the innovation of loneliness’. What is the connection between social networks and being lonely? The …

“…idea, that we will never have to be alone, is central to changing our psyches.  It’s shaping a new way of being; the best way to describe it is “I share, therefore I am”. We use technology to define ourselves by sharing our thoughts and feelings even as we’re having them. Furthermore, we’re faking experiences so we’ll have something to share. So we can feel alive.”

YouTube: The Innovation of Loneliness

Twitter: hopkinsdavid / David Hopkins

Where would I be without Twitter?

[Read this next bit as though it's a well known Sinead O'Conner song]

It’s been 5 years, 30 days, and 53 minutes since my first tweet. Here is it:

Twitter: hopkinsdavid / David Hopkins

In that 5 years, 30 days, etc. I’ve made nearly 25,000 tweets. Admittedly not all of them are relevant, interesting, insightful, funny, or worth repeating, but some of them have been. Some of them have been ideas, sharing, conversations, photos, jokes, people I’ve met or places I’ve been, books or journals I’ve read, etc. Some are re-tweets (RT), mentions, replies, etc. And some are just banal observations for no other reason than Twitter was available and somewhere I can put a random thought, observation, rant, or other piece of useless information.  Continue reading

JISC Legal

Social Media for Staff: Legal Checklist

This is a great reference guide, from JISC Legal,  for universities, colleges and learning providers to consider in relation to social media use by staff.  The aim of the checklist is to ensure risks are recognised and managed appropriately, while clarifying for staff what the boundaries are.

JISC LegalDownload here: Social Media for Staff: Legal Checklist

It includes items such as:

  • The institution has a clear strategy which reflects its approach to risk.
  • A social media policy makes staff aware of their responsibilities, and defines social media broadly to include new technologies and mobile devices.
  • The policy clarifies where ‘professional’ ends and ‘private’ begins, and makes clear what constitutes ‘unacceptable use’
  • Staff are aware what is required prior to posting relevant content e.g. an appropriate disclaimer or appropriate authorisation.

For more information, including links to other resources, visit jiscleg.al/socialmedia

So, does your institution / employer have any of these in place? If so please drop a comment and link below and share.