Tag Archives: Teacher

Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference 2014 BbTLC2014

Blackboard T&L Conference, Dublin #BbTLC2014

Next week is the 2014 Blackboard Teaching and Learning Conference in Dublin. The programme looks very comprehensive and has 6 streams in motion, which means it’s going to be very difficult to attend and cover all the sessions I want to attend – which means I’m going to have to be very selective about what, and who, I see.

Here’s my first impressions of what I will try and see –

Wednesday, April 30.

  • Keynote / Prof Stephen Heppell. I have met and talked with Prof Heppell on numerous occasions (at Learning Without Frontiers in 2011 and during my time working at Bournemouth University) and know that his unique perspective and style will make this keynote both interesting and hugely profound on the issues affecting education today. This is one session you do not want to miss.  Continue reading

What are you teaching the world?

Have you seen the Kid President’s message to mums everywhere? If not then watch it, it’s great. However, here’s  his next video, his pep talk to teachers and students.

Love it … “together we’re louder!”.

YouTube: Kid President’s Pep Talk to Teachers and Students!

Creative Commons

Creative Commons Infographic: Licenses Explained

Do you use images or photos? Do you check with the owner before saving or copying or using? Are you using Creative Commons (CC) images and think that it’s all OK because the image labelled as CC therefore you’ve done all your supposed to?

Do you in fact understand what Creative Commons is? If in doubt, before you go any further, watch this video: Creative Commons Explained.

Right, so you understand CC now? Then you’ll also be needing this Infographic: “Creative Commons: free photos for bloggers“:

Creative Commons
Click to view full Infographic

A photo or image placed under a Creative Commons license enables you, the ‘borrower’ to copy, distribute, and display the work providing the photo or image is correctly attributed to the owner. Every CC license applies worldwide, is non-revocable, is not exclusive, and lasts for the duration of the works copyright.

Continue reading

Twitter for Teachers … a great video introduction

I know I tweeted this out earlier this week but it’s so good I wanted to make sure I didn’t forget it, so here it is again:

YouTube: To Tweet or Not to Tweet?

Produced in a great puppet-master way it’s engaging and informative, and really good if you want to demonstrate to someone the benefits of Twitter for academic purposes: research, student engagement, etc.

“You might ask yourself how something written in 140 characters or less can be interesting and relevant to education or your pedagogical practice? Surprisingly it is often enough to get us interested in reading more by following a link, to start a conversation, or to get us thinking about something new. And that’s just by following a few people who tweet, you don’t have to tweet a peep.”

Thanks to Edutopia for this and many more excellent Twitter / Video resources.

Unlikely source for teaching advice?

With the iPod set to random whilst driving home tonight I had a blast from the past and had The Wildhearts’ track ‘Lovesh*t” blaring out – and then remembered these lyrics moments before I heard them:

“Teacher, teacher won’t you open your eyes, teach me something that I need to know?”

How much do we hear this at the moment, that classess and education needs to be more ‘relevant’ (bearing in mind this track was recorded in 1993)?

What tracks and lyrics do you know that have a message for educators?

Blackboard Essentials for Teachers

Book Review: “Blackboard Essentials for Teachers”

Blackboard Essentials for TeachersBlackboard Essentials for Teachers” is new book written by William Rice for teachers and educators who use Blackboard. By following the examples in the book you will be guided through the process of creating your own Blackboard course, adding static material for students to view (such as pages, links, and media), adding interaction to your courses (discussion boards, blogs,  wikis, etc) and using interactions to engage students in the course through the communication channels.

Scroll down to find out how you can win a complementary copy of the paper or eBook edition of the book from the publishers …

What the book hopes to do is to get a novice or first-time Blackboard user familiar with the interface and features in a manner that they can (a) understand, and (b) use in relation to a taught course site. With the help of the book the reader should be able to:

  • create web pages using Blackboard’s test editor (note: the new content editor is not featured, therefore the book is already a little out of date),
  • organise courses using pages and modules,
  • upload files and learning materials
  • set up discussion boards, blogs, and wikis for student engagement and interaction
  • build and administer online tests
  • online assignment submission
  • manage groups
  • use announcements effectively for student information

I was one of the technical reviewers of the book while it was being written by the author, and provided feedback on the content as well as the presentation style. I’ll say now that I received a complimentary copy of the book for my time and trouble in reviewing the submitted chapters, but received no other payment for my work on the book (i.e. I don’t have to do this review, I wanted to). There, now that’s out of the way.

This review is as much about the book as the process of being involved in the reviewing process, one that I enjoyed and would happily be involved in again (given the chance).

What do I think of the book?
It’s a basic introduction to Blackboard that non-Blackboard users will welcome. There is enough here for more advanced users too but it lacks explanation (for my liking) of the more pedagogical implications and applications of the tools and features of Blackboard. I do, however, agree that the approach used in the book is appropriate for the target audience. The book is effective in its approach and the way it introduces the various features and tools, and goes further than other guides I have read on the administration tools that can help academic and support staff engage the students online.

The downside of the paper book is, as ever, the black-and-white images. I am a very visual learner and like to see examples of what the author was trying to explain – so why not put more images in? Trying to describe a web page is best done with an image of the web page (in colour)! This kind of book subject would do well in an expanded eBook format with more dynamic images (video even) showing in much more detail the process or pages in question. Even if the paper copy is black and white, could they not have created the eBook with colour images?

How is the book structured?
Each chapter is well structured and written from the authors experience, but is based on the open CourseSites and may be subject to discrepancies if the Blackboard installation you have is set up differently from the one described in the book.

With different elements of Blackboard highlighted in the book it’s easy to find your way around the often complicated processes for creating materials or assessments, bold text boxes break the content up and bring new terms, features, or ‘quick tips’ to the fore make it a good reference book.

The structure is good, starting with the basics of organising your Blackboard course and setting up/loading materials before getting into the newer tools like wikis or blogs. My personal preference would have been to leave these kinds of tools until later (after handling the assignments, tests, groups, and Grade Centre) as wikis and blogs are good collaborative and reflective tools that are underpinned from concepts dealt with in those (earlier) chapters. Putting the Announcements and communication chapter so late in the book is a mistake, and I would have this nearer the front and this is still the more underutilised area of Blackboard I see on a regular basis.

One aspect of Blackboard that the book did not cover in enough detail for me is a ‘good’ structure for a Blackboard course site – I know this will always be subjective to the individual or Institution where we/you work but a demonstration of a good structure (and why it’s good) could have made it easier to explain why some of the other features are used, when, and where (contextual).

Did my revisions/suggestions make the final edition?
I think there are a few instances where I can see my comments had an influence on the final edit, but it could easily have been a comment made by the other reviewers too. The difficulty when reviewing a book (I have done a couple now) is that I only see one-chapter-at-a-time, and not always in the order they appear in the final edition. I also had no knowledge of the chapter list so therefore no knowledge of where the chapter I was reading would appear, and what came before or was to come after it. This made it difficult to review as much of what I wanted to know in each chapter may be dealt with later, or not, I didn’t know.

What would I include that the author didn’t?
I have already said, for me, it’s the presentation of the book that is mainly at fault, and to this I can’t blame the author – he’s only working according to the publisher guidelines and requirements. When dealing with a visual topic and/or software that needs explaining and demonstrating why try and describe or explain it in words when an image or video is far easier to understand?

The use of links (even QR Codes?) could have directed the reader off to a YouTube channel with supporting screencasts of some of the more trickier set up tools ro techniques, which would have helped with explanations.

Would I buy the book?
The book is impressive and a comprehensive guide to using Blackboard, and there is something for everyone here, even advanced users.

I can see there will need to be some fairly( major?) revisions in future, or indeed another book, when Blackboard has another update or new release, but the majority of the elementary features (Announcements, Groups, etc) have not changed over the last release or so, much!

Book Review: Blackboard Essentials for Teachers

The book is available in either paper or eBook format, ‘Blackboard Essentials for Teachers’ is available online from PacktPub.


Book Give Away!

The publishers are kind enough to let me copies of the book to give away – two paper and two electronic editions. All you have to do is leave a comment below about how the book will change how you work with Blackboard (and your preference of paper or eBook).

Only comments made to this blog – www.dontwasteyourtime.co.uk – will count as an entry to the raffle and my decision on the winners is final. I will contact the winners and get the required details from you and pass these across to PacktPub where you receive your prize. Please note that paper copies can only be sent to UK, US, and European addresses.

Question everything #pelc12 #edtech

Thank to Dave Cormier for sharing this video on Twitter, it’s amazing! I hope you think so to.

YouTube: notice. {vision 1 of 5}

 I have transcribed a few of the sections that really move and inspire me, what these children are doing/have done is brilliant, I hope you agree.

“Thousands of years ago the native Americans embraced the idea of a village, the entire community as teacher, as curriculum. The idea that everybody had something to offer was given. Somewhere along the way competition bled into efficiency and efficiency bled into standardisation. We are missing community, cross-generational expertise. We believe that technology wants to help us get back to to us.”

“We are suggesting that is compulsion, the assumption that was must teach and measure certain things, that is keeping us from betterness, keeping us mediocre rather than breathtaking. So we stop measuring learning, instead we prepare people for uncertainty, we facilitate curiosities, we create ‘community’. We create spaces of permission with nothing to prove because we believe ‘there is never nothing going on’.”

If you’re interested, check out the other 4 videos in the series: Dream (2), Connect (3), Do (4), and Be (5).

“There is never nothing going on” – Ray Rafiti

Now, I’m not an educational activist, nor do I want to upset the system or hack anything, but I do wonder why we continue to do things the same way despite evidence showing us there is a better way. From this video I can reflect my own experience at school, at university, etc, that I was not in the best ‘environment’ for my style of learning: I had to take myself out of the classroom to be comfortable to learn (but I still sat in the classroom with everyone else – does this mean I did twice as much?). From the video I question whether Schools are preparing children to learn a subject or learn to live in the world. There is a place for both, but I tend to see an either or approach, never both? Have I missed something … “we stop measuring learning, instead we prepare people for uncertainty, we facilitate curiosities, we create ‘community’.”

It strikes a chord with me, nothing more than that. And it is that chord that reminded me of the keynote that Simon Finch gave at PELeCON12 (pelc12) in April this year (2012), he opened ‘Something Better Change” with this video:

Another Brick in the Simfin

Powerful stuff, and equally powerful was the full 50+ minute keynote – watch and be inspired (and he knows his stuff from working WITH and IN schools, not just talking ABOUT schools).

Plymough Enhanced Learning Conference : Simon Finch Keynote