Tag Archives: Tweet

BYOD4L

Bring Your Own Devices for Learning: July 14-18 #BYOD4L

After such a successful run earlier this year, the team behind BYOD4L (Sue Beckingham, Chrissi Nerantzi, Andrew Middleton, et al) are working their magic again – put the dates in your diary: BYOD4L July 14-18. I have been invited back again this time to work with Sue, Andrew, and Chrissi (and the other team members) and will be engaging course participants online.

If you’re interested the details are below

YouTube: Bring Your Own Devices for Learning: July 14-18, 2014

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12 ways teachers are using social media in the classroom

This resource from Vicki Davis – “A Guidebook for Social Media in the Classroom” on Edutopia is a good starting point for planning the inclusion of social media in learning spaces.

Vicki closes by saying something very similar to what I submitted to the Mobile Learning – “Improving Learning with Mobile Technology” eBook:

“Social media is here. It’s just another resource and doesn’t have to be a distraction from learning objectives. Social media is another tool that you can use to make your classroom more engaging, relevant and culturally diverse.”

The list consists of:

  1. Tweet or post status updates as a class.
  2. Write blog posts about what students are learning.
  3. Let your students write for the world.
  4. Connect to other classrooms through social media.
  5. Use Facebook to get feedback for your students’ online science fair projects.
  6. Use YouTube for your students to host a show or a podcast.
  7. Create Twitter accounts for a special interest projects.
  8. Ask questions to engage your students in authentic learning.
  9. Communicate with other classrooms.
  10. Create projects with other teachers.
  11. Share your learning with the world.
  12. Further a cause that you care about.

What would you add (or remove) from the list to help others utilise students and their devices?

Image source: Life on the wire (CC BY 2.0)

Who gives a tweet? Evaluating microblog content gives us an insight into what makes a valuable academic tweet

What makes a ‘valuable’ academic tweet? #edtech

So, you can make a tweet that people will (statistically) read, re-tweet, reply, share, save, or ignore, and here’s the proof.

If, like the original article suggests, you are an academic using twitter for academic use (and many do, successfully) then there are a few ‘styles’ of tweets that you need to be aware of, and how your audience, your network, your PLN (Personal Learning Network), will view them.

“Broadly, we found that a little more than a third (36 per cent) of tweets were considered worth reading, while a quarter were not worth reading at all. (39 per cent elicited no strong opinion). Despite the social nature of Twitter, current mood, activity or location tweets were particularly disliked, while questions to followers and information sharing were most worthwhile.”

PS. it’s quite a small graphic so I’ve enlarged it slightly, hence the fuzzy writing/outlines.

Who gives a tweet? Evaluating microblog content gives us an insight into what makes a valuable academic tweet

Image source and original article: LSE – Who gives a tweet?

The article highlights the following tweet behaviours:

  • Tweets emphasising real-time information, old news, or even links that were fresh this morning, can be annoying. Continue reading

Anatomy of a Tweet

A beginners guide to a ‘tweet’

For those who are new to Twitter (and those not) a ‘tweet’ can be a confusing thing. So, reproduced from EdTEchSandyK‘s website is the ‘anatomy of a tweet’:

Anatomy of a Tweet
EdTechSandyK: How to Decode a Tweet

Does that explain it? No, then how about this?

  • When you say something on Twitter … that’s a Tweet.
  • You have 140 characters for your tweet, and that includes spaces, hyphens, quote marks, links, etc.
  • Your tweet is seen by everyone on Twitter and on the Internet … but only if they know you or search for something you said.
  • You can follow people, and they can follow you. By following someone their tweets will appear in your timeline.
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