Tag Archives: Tweetiquette

Tweet-chat

Tips on running a Tweet-chat

Last week I was involved in the second iteration / cohort / running of the BYOD4L short course. Along with a number of colleagues we ran a series of tweet-chats each evening along the course themes – timed between 8-9pm the tweet-chats involved facilitators posing questions and ‘facilitating’ the responses and direction the chat took.

Taking is back to the beginning … what is a tweet-chat?

“A TweetChat is a virtual meeting or gathering on Twitter to discuss a common topic. The chat usually lasts one hour and will include some questions to stimulate discussion.” – BYOD4L Tweet-chat

“A Twitter chat is a public Twitter conversation around one unique hashtag. This hashtag allows you to follow the discussion and participate in it. Twitter chats are usually recurring and on specific topics to regularly connect people with these interests.” Social Media Examiner

I thought I’d write up my experiences of running three tweet-chats now: two for BYOD4L, and one for the Leicester Forensic Science FutureLearn MOOC. Each uses a different approach, but both very valid and engaging for the students / participants as well as the course team(s).

Continue reading

Network Fluency (@jaycross‎)

Thanks to Jay Cross for this short and sweet 2 minute video on ‘Network Fluency’. With the Internet and the connections we make through it we have enabled ourselves and our learning to take a new level.

“Connections begat connections. Soon everything was connected to everything else. A parallel universe sprang up alongside society, the Internet became an integral part of business and leisure: those who weren’t fluent and using the ‘net were marginalised. Not only that but everything happened faster and faster and you were required to proclaim your ‘network identity’ and figure out what you were going to do. And what you’re going to do is become fluent in the way networks work.”

Jay goes on to highlight three main areas where we need to be to become ‘fluent': making sense of stuff, giving back, collaboration, and connection.

YouTube: Network Fluency / Jay Cross

Who gives a tweet? Evaluating microblog content gives us an insight into what makes a valuable academic tweet

What makes a ‘valuable’ academic tweet? #edtech

So, you can make a tweet that people will (statistically) read, re-tweet, reply, share, save, or ignore, and here’s the proof.

If, like the original article suggests, you are an academic using twitter for academic use (and many do, successfully) then there are a few ‘styles’ of tweets that you need to be aware of, and how your audience, your network, your PLN (Personal Learning Network), will view them.

“Broadly, we found that a little more than a third (36 per cent) of tweets were considered worth reading, while a quarter were not worth reading at all. (39 per cent elicited no strong opinion). Despite the social nature of Twitter, current mood, activity or location tweets were particularly disliked, while questions to followers and information sharing were most worthwhile.”

PS. it’s quite a small graphic so I’ve enlarged it slightly, hence the fuzzy writing/outlines.

Who gives a tweet? Evaluating microblog content gives us an insight into what makes a valuable academic tweet

Image source and original article: LSE – Who gives a tweet?

The article highlights the following tweet behaviours:

  • Tweets emphasising real-time information, old news, or even links that were fresh this morning, can be annoying. Continue reading

Anatomy of a Tweet

A beginners guide to a ‘tweet’

For those who are new to Twitter (and those not) a ‘tweet’ can be a confusing thing. So, reproduced from EdTEchSandyK‘s website is the ‘anatomy of a tweet':

Anatomy of a Tweet
EdTechSandyK: How to Decode a Tweet

Does that explain it? No, then how about this?

  • When you say something on Twitter … that’s a Tweet.
  • You have 140 characters for your tweet, and that includes spaces, hyphens, quote marks, links, etc.
  • Your tweet is seen by everyone on Twitter and on the Internet … but only if they know you or search for something you said.
  • You can follow people, and they can follow you. By following someone their tweets will appear in your timeline.
  • Continue reading

Twitter tips every teacher should know about

Twitter Tips we should all know, and care, about #edchat

I use Twitter a lot. Perhaps too much. I, like many others, have learned the hard way about hashtags, avatars, profiles, “tweetiquette” (or ‘twettiquette’), URL shorteners, keeping it real, keeping it professional, keeping it polite (well, I do), etc. Someone coming to Twitter now, all fresh and eager to get stuck in, might find it hard to find their own voice in the noise that the rest of us are making.

This infographic is a good start – share this around the office and the rest of your network (real-space or virtual) and help them get accustomed to the world of Twitter without falling in to the bad habits the rest of us have found:

Twitter tips every teacher should know about
“Twitter tips every teacher should know about”

Handy hints like those below could help newbies find their feet quickly and start to benefit from the Twitter conversations that the rest of us are already enjoying:

  • Include your website/blog link in your profile
  • Think ‘networking event’, it’s OK to greet people, but auto-DMs are not the way
  • It doesn’t have to be perfect, it does have to be you
  • Engage with people outside of your normal friends circle
  • As hard as it might be resist the number-of-followers-game, don’t worry about the numbers: If you tweet good content, they will come
  • Good mix: check your ‘profile’ tab often. Would you follow you?
  • Balance tweets, reply’s, retweets – too much of a good thing is still too much

Above all, share and share alike – attribute work to the original author (they’ll do the same for you and your content, links, etc.) and help others. After all, we were once all new at this, yes?

WordPress

WordPress Plugin #7: Twitter Card

Note: In this series I’ll delve into some of the better plugins available for WordPress that I am already using, or about to start using. I’m aiming to highlight 30 of the better plugins.

If, like me, you use Twitter a lot, and have something like WordTwit installed (tweet your new blog post when you publish it) then you’ll also want to explore the new world of Twitter Cards. Thanks for Paul Simbeck-Hampson for showing and explaining this to me.

What is it … well, Twitter Cards:

“make it possible for you to attach media experiences to Tweets that link to your content. Simply add a few lines of HTML to your webpages, and users who Tweet links to your content will have a “card” added to the Tweet that’s visible to all of their followers.”

Here is it in action, it’s the snippet of the linked webpage (and image) that appears beneath the tweet on both the website and in Twitter Apps – it comes into it’s element if someone tweets a link to or about one of your blog posts and doesn’t include your twitter name, as the Card will do this for you, so your work is correctly attributed:

WordPressPlugin #7: Twitter Card (Working)

Here’s an example of a non-cited tweet, where my Twitter username ‘@hopkinsdavid’ is not mentioned:

WordPressPlugin #7: Twitter Card (Working)

How does this work, and what do you need? First you need to install the Twitter Cards plugin (available as download or by searching the Plugin database through your WordPress admin panel). It’s simple and done in a matter of seconds, and that’s all you need to do in WordPress.

The next stage is to test it using the Twitter developer page- Twitter Development / Cards Preview –  and request its activation. Take a URL for one of your blog posts or pages and enter it in the box and press ‘preview’, to get something like this, including the snippet of the post and the image:

WordPressPlugin #7: Twitter Card (Preview)

 NB: You must be sure that the post in WordPress has an image set as the ‘featured image’ if you want it to show the image in the Twitter Card. If it doesn’t have one set it’ll display the text with no image – it’s not a bad thing but, if you’re working hard to promote yourself and images are important then it’s worth making sure you have one set.

The final step is to apply to have the Card approved and activated on this page: dev.twitter.com/form/participate-twitter-cards. The form does state:

“As we roll out this new feature to users and publishers, we are looking for sites with great content and those that drive active discussion and activity on Twitter. Expect a few weeks for turn-around time. You will receive an email message with the confirmation or rejection notice.” [emphasis is mine]

Fill in all the fields as best you can and sit back and wait. Simple! It took just over 12 hours for mine to be approved, you may be luckier than me.

First there was ‘Netiquette’, now there’s ‘Twettiquette’

You can’t deny that if you’re involved in the Internet you ought to have tried Twitter by now. As I’ve said in previous posts, and presentations, it’s not about how others use it, it’s about how YOU use it … and it isn’t something you’ll master overnight but rather something that will grow as you find your feet and find a purpose for it.

Well, here is a great presentation from Steve Wheeler on ‘The Art of Twitter‘ as he thinks that;

“… the time has now come to introduce a set of guidelines for Twitter – ‘Twettiquette’ if you like”

Using simple terminology that we can all understand, this guide is another great way to introduce newbies to Twitter, and for those of us who consider ourselves proficient (or semi-proficient) in it’s use it’s an amusing recap on what we already do.

[Full credit to Steve for coining the phrase 'Twettiquette']


All I need to know about Twitter I learned at Kindergarten
View more presentations from Steve Wheeler.