Category Archives: eLearning

iOS8 keyboard emojis

Emoji keyboard (iOS)

I don’t like emojis. There, I’ve said it. Yes I use the simple ones like :-) [smile] or ;-) [wink] but that’s about it.

I like them even less when I always seem to hit, by accident, the icon on the iOS keyboard which brings them up, when I really meant to go to CAPS or numbers.

So, here’s how to get rid of them. in iOS8 go to:

  • Settings -
  • General -
  • Keyboard -
  • Keyboards – you’ll have probably two here.
  • Choose ‘Edit’ and delete the Emojis.

Simple!

iOS8 keyboard emojis

Netflix

Learning the Netflix way

I’ve just read the post by Donald Clark called ‘What does ‘learning’ have to learn from Netflix?’ which has resonated with much of my own thinking from recent work and discussions I’ve been having on Twitter.

I signed up for one of the free 1 month trials of Netflix when it was first available in the UK. I enjoyed it, then cancelled it. I’d got what I wanted. Then I realised I wanted access to the binge-watching phenomenons like House of Cards, Breaking Bad, and the one that started them all, 24. But more than this, as Donald mentions in his post, I wanted access to the kind of programmes I like and at my convenience. I am not always available at 9PM every Thursday to watch the latest instalment of my favourite show(s), just like I don’t actually want to wait a full week for the next episode. I first watched 24 on DVD, not Sky, so I did binge-watch the show, usually 4 full episodes a night (or 1 DVD) and went to bed wired for the next marathon 24-fest.

So, if we’re changing our viewing habits, are we changing our learning habits (as pointed out by Donald)?

Yes. Consider Donald’s points:  Continue reading

David Hopkins - Why I tweet

Why I tweet #edchat

Inspired by the many talented people who draw and sketch their thoughts (and hoping I can emulate even just a smidgen of their abilities) here is my first (public) drawing from the iPad App Paper by 53 – why I tweet.

David Hopkins - Why I tweet

Please feel free to share or remix, comment or criticise  (although I’d rather you didn’t), and try for yourself. The Paper App and all the pens are now free (but wasn’t when I first found it!) and have produced some amazing artwork and drawings, some of which Julian Stodd used and allowed to be used in The Really Useful #EdTechBook.

It’s also worth noting why I add hashtags to my blog post titles, read about it from 2011!

Bricks

What I’ve learned from my kids: Lego

I used to have a lot of Lego as a child. I don’t remember Lego as being about themes and sets or kits, as it is these days, but there was always a brick or two lying on the floor, just ready to ruin your day when you trod on it.

From the age of about 4 up until 10 or 11 Lego featured highly on my birthday and christmas list, right up until my Dad surprised me with a ZX81 computer, and a book (or was it a magazine) that would teach me to code with 20 games to ‘load’ (type) in.

Continue reading

Vinyl LP Collection

Maybe digital isn’t all it’s cracked up to be?

So much of what I do these days, and what I produce, is digital. Tweets, status updates, audio & video files, documents, reports, etc. Less than 1% gets to where it needs to get to in any other way than by electronic transfer – money to friends (bank transfer), documents to colleagues (emails, networks, Dropbox), sharing (tweets, blog posts, status updates, etc.). Hell, even a message home to say I’ll be late will be a Facebook message instead of a phone call!

For my 40th birthday my brother bought my a USB turntable (Denon DP-200USB), something I (we) could use to rip our extensive collection of 70’s, 80’s and 90’s vinyl collection of rock, metal, and various dubious listening pleasures. So, the past few winter’s I’ve been holed up in the spare room with 300+ vinyl records (I’m sure we had more) and the turntable, ripping them, adding to iTunes, loading cover art and track listings, transferring to my iPod and listening to my childhood and teenage years in the car during the daily commute.

Even my two boys (ages 4 and 5) are getting in on it, asking for certain tracks or bands in the car with me, looking over the vinyl covers, reading the lyrics, laughing at the band photos (it’s the hair!), and not quite understanding just ‘how’ the sound works! Continue reading

Skills & Attributes of today's learners

Skills & Attributes of today’s students

What a lovely way to demonstrate the skills and attributes of today’s learners (thx to @suebecks for sharing):

Skills & Attributes of today's learners

While some of us look to the skills, some to the technology, and maybe even some to the individual, it is clear that somewhere there needs to be a generic and ‘global’ view of the learner, the (learning) climate, Continue reading

Peer Instruction and Clickers

Peer Instruction and Clickers

A trip up the motorway this week and I was in Manchester for the Turning Technologies User Conference. I had high hopes for the day but was also prepared to be disappointed (sorry) as these events are often really only people talking about what they, and others, already do … and I’ve heard a great deal about TurningPoint and the uses of clickers in classrooms before.

Thankfully, I was disappointed. It was better than I expected. The sessions were a careful mix of experience and theory, case studies and chat. More than this, the opening from Prof. Eric Mazur helped me formalise some previous thoughts and discussions, and put a name to what I’d being doing … Peer Instruction.  Continue reading

ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

Learning Technologist of the Year #altc #LTaward

The 2014 ALTC conference is the first I’ve attended in person, it’s one of the conferences I’ve wanted to get to since I started in this career. It’s also the first year I’ve been part of the Learning Technologist of the Year award. I am proud and honoured to be recognised, through the ‘highly commended’ LTOTY award, for my work.

  • This is Part 14 in my series where I am posting on my thoughts about being a Learning Technologist. This, and the previous posts, have been collected together with context and commentary into my eBook ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’

Many thanks to the award committee, to ALT, to those I’ve worked with, and those who I’ve had contact / tweets / conversations with over the years. Just so you’re in no doubt, I haven’t finished yet, there’s more to come from me … !

As part of the timetable for the ALT conference I was asked to present a short session to delegates on the LTOTY award, in support of the award. For me it’s all about the main/core attitudes we, LTs, need to have: confidence, communications, creative, curious, adaptable, relaxed, agreeable, humble, and above all, just be ready to take on all work, at all levels, to the best or your ability and recognise when you need to learn something new!

Here are my slides:

David Hopkins: 2014 Learning Technologist Of The Year Award #ALTC

As part of the award I also wrote an article for the ALT Newsletter, again highlighting my work and the award – I used the space to talk about the attitudes, work ethics, professionalism, etc. of LTs. You can read my ALT Newsletter article here.

And, just to prove it really did happen, he’s the photographic proof, thank you ALT:

ALTC CONFERENCE

Cover image credit: freepik.com

Here’s My eLearning Pet Peeve. What’s Yours?

Here’s my eLearning pet peeve. What’s yours?

Tom Khulmann, on the Rapid E-Learning Blog, regularly writes on techniques and tips for eLearning success. Recently he wrote about a discussion thread happening on the Articulate community site about pet peeves of eLearning professionals. In his reply he outlined not only some of the more recognisable pet peeves from the community (e.g. “the words ‘can you just’…?”) but his own personal favourite: locked course navigation.

Mine … well, the list is long and there isn’t one single thing that stands out from the rest, but if I had to name one pet peeve over all the others I’d say it was apathy. With the rate of change and advancements in technology there really is no excuse for the apathy that exudes from academic circles on the use or implementation of a ‘modern’ (read ‘up to date’) use of technology to enhance learning experiences.  Continue reading

Creamed

Jack & Jill of all trades (@reedyreedles)

Peter Reed (@reedyreedles) has made some important and thought provoking posts recently. This is a kind of reply / addition / reflection / enhancement of those posts from my own perspective. Let the games begin … but first it’d help if you had read Pete’s posts:

Yes.

That’s the short answer. I’m not sure there is even a question there, but I like what Pete has said, I agree with him on both posts. Learning Technologists (LTs) do need to be a Jack (or Jill) of all trades, a master of none (or nearly none).  Continue reading