Category Archives: eLearning

Peer Instruction and Clickers

Peer Instruction and Clickers

A trip up the motorway this week and I was in Manchester for the Turning Technologies User Conference. I had high hopes for the day but was also prepared to be disappointed (sorry) as these events are often really only people talking about what they, and others, already do … and I’ve heard a great deal about TurningPoint and the uses of clickers in classrooms before.

Thankfully, I was disappointed. It was better than I expected. The sessions were a careful mix of experience and theory, case studies and chat. More than this, the opening from Prof. Eric Mazur helped me formalise some previous thoughts and discussions, and put a name to what I’d being doing … Peer Instruction.  Continue reading

ALTC 2014 Riding Giants

Learning Technologist of the Year #altc #LTaward

The 2014 ALTC conference is the first I’ve attended in person, it’s one of the conferences I’ve wanted to get to since I started in this career. It’s also the first year I’ve been part of the Learning Technologist of the Year award. I am proud and honoured to be recognised, through the ‘highly commended’ LTOTY award, for my work.

  • This is Part 14 in my series where I am posting on my thoughts about being a Learning Technologist. This, and the previous posts, have been collected together with context and commentary into my eBook ‘What is a Learning Technologist?’

Many thanks to the award committee, to ALT, to those I’ve worked with, and those who I’ve had contact / tweets / conversations with over the years. Just so you’re in no doubt, I haven’t finished yet, there’s more to come from me … !

As part of the timetable for the ALT conference I was asked to present a short session to delegates on the LTOTY award, in support of the award. For me it’s all about the main/core attitudes we, LTs, need to have: confidence, communications, creative, curious, adaptable, relaxed, agreeable, humble, and above all, just be ready to take on all work, at all levels, to the best or your ability and recognise when you need to learn something new!

Here are my slides:

David Hopkins: 2014 Learning Technologist Of The Year Award #ALTC

As part of the award I also wrote an article for the ALT Newsletter, again highlighting my work and the award – I used the space to talk about the attitudes, work ethics, professionalism, etc. of LTs. You can read my ALT Newsletter article here.

And, just to prove it really did happen, he’s the photographic proof, thank you ALT:

ALTC CONFERENCE

Cover image credit: freepik.com

Here’s My eLearning Pet Peeve. What’s Yours?

Here’s my eLearning pet peeve. What’s yours?

Tom Khulmann, on the Rapid E-Learning Blog, regularly writes on techniques and tips for eLearning success. Recently he wrote about a discussion thread happening on the Articulate community site about pet peeves of eLearning professionals. In his reply he outlined not only some of the more recognisable pet peeves from the community (e.g. “the words ‘can you just’…?”) but his own personal favourite: locked course navigation.

Mine … well, the list is long and there isn’t one single thing that stands out from the rest, but if I had to name one pet peeve over all the others I’d say it was apathy. With the rate of change and advancements in technology there really is no excuse for the apathy that exudes from academic circles on the use or implementation of a ‘modern’ (read ‘up to date’) use of technology to enhance learning experiences.  Continue reading

Creamed

Jack & Jill of all trades (@reedyreedles)

Peter Reed (@reedyreedles) has made some important and thought provoking posts recently. This is a kind of reply / addition / reflection / enhancement of those posts from my own perspective. Let the games begin … but first it’d help if you had read Pete’s posts:

Yes.

That’s the short answer. I’m not sure there is even a question there, but I like what Pete has said, I agree with him on both posts. Learning Technologists (LTs) do need to be a Jack (or Jill) of all trades, a master of none (or nearly none).  Continue reading

'Dolly mixture' courses

Dolly Mixture courses

This week I had a great chat with @nancyrubin and @CliveBuckley after I re-tweeted Nancy:

Are Courses Outdated? MIT Considers Offering ‘Modules’ Instead

My thoughts on courses and training, as I mentioned above, as just this: courses tend to fit the organisational structure of the issuing body and don’t always fit the ‘need’ of the learner. You join (example) a specific school or faculty to start and complete your degree in Business Management or Economics or Sociology. But what if the specific subjects you really want to study are only loosely based around the course structure that the institution wants to teach? Continue reading

The Education of Tomorow

Infographic – The education of tomorrow

Infographics are great, when they have something worthwhile to say, and show the data in a worthwhile way. This is one of the better ones – The Education of Tomorrow.

Here are some of the headline details from the infographic:

  • 90% of college students and high school seniors (yes, another US centric dataset) see tablets as valuable educational tools.
  • 63% of college students and high school seniors believe tablets will transform the way college students learn in the future.
  • 60% of college students prefer digital formats when reading books inside or outside of class.
  • Continue reading

10 Ways to Keep ELearning Interesting

10 ways to keep eLearning interesting

From the  Sh!ft eLearning website – 10 Ways to Keep ELearning Interesting. Creating the learning resources and delivering the content is one thing, but creating and delivering content that is both engaging and thought provoking (and ‘sticky’) is something else. This infographic (below) is a nice handy chart on the kinds of things you could consider adding to keep the learner interested.

“Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners’ attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult learners are both busier and more free to indulge in distractions. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionals, so here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning.” 10 Ways to Keep ELearning Interesting

Education and the Internet

Reading: Education and the Internet

The 2014 IGGY Junior Commission report on Education and the Internet is an important read. I’ve not had chance to digest all of it yet, but what I have read makes for some uncomfortable reading for Higher Education – take note: children understand the technology they have access to, the understand the possibilities (and challenge them), and know how they want to use it and bring it into all aspects of their lives, including learning / classroom / education.

“The IGGY Junior Commission enables ten of the brightest young minds to collaborate with one another to achieve a global goal. These young people are the potential leaders of the future and deserve an opportunity to share their views and recommendations.”

Research and interviews from 289 school children and 109 teachers from 14 different countries helped form the conclusions of the report which include:  Continue reading

5 Tips To Engage Your Students in eLearning

5 Tips for engaging your students #eLearning

A handy ‘5 tips for engaging your students in eLearning’ infographic – something to print out and stick on the wall as a handy reminder of what you/we can do to make it easier for students to get the best out of their (e)learning:

  • Keep it interesting & relevant
  • Keep it organised and uncluttered
  • Keep it interesting
  • Keep up to date
  • Make it engaging & interactive

5 Tips To Engage Your Students in eLearning

Continue reading

The trails we leave #eLearning

Continuing my interest in data and how it can be used, this project and associated video is a very useful indication of how data from one App (called ‘Human’) can show us how we move.

Do you walk, run, cycle? Continue reading