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eBooks

Books vs eBooks: it’s about WHY as well as WHERE?

So, I buy books and eBooks. It’s not a massive revelation, but if all you read is websites like Mashable or The Verge it might seem unusual to do both.

What I see discussed about the difference between physical books and eBooks is about where we choose to read them. Plenty is written about where we read each type (and why) or how you buy or read them … but for me it’s also about why I buy and read them on the different formats.

I’ll own up to to it now and say that, yes, I do use a large online retailer for the majority of my books … I don’t have much spare money for this activity and I need to be careful about how much and how often I spend my money.

I am quite particular about the way I buy my books. I tend to buy fiction books to read on either my Kindle or using the Kindle App on my iPad. The Kindle is so much more flexible in its ease for carrying and holding than both the physical copy and iPad Kindle App (although I may have the iPad on me more often than the Kindle). I have all my Kindle books on my Kindle (I’ve still a long way to go before I start to find the limit on space), so it’s easy to choose my next book.

Continue reading

Julie Wedgwood, EdTechBook author

Interview with Julie Wedgwood, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, David Hopkins, January 2015As part of a series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this eighth post I talk to Julie Wedgwood, a specialist in technology supported learning and experienced eLearning practitioner.

In the video below we talk about eLearning, what has changed since we judged the 2011 eLearning Awards, and Julie’s innovative skills audit / assessment which forms the basis for her #EdTechBook chapter:  Continue reading

Interview with Terese Bird, #EdTechBook chapter author

Interview with Terese Bird, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a new series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this seventh post I talk to Terese Bird, Learning Technologist and SCORE research fellow, University of Leicester.

DH – Hi Terese. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

TB – Really, I do my job on the strength of first social media, and second mobile devices. I remember when I was being interviewed for my job at Leicester back in 2009, I was asked how I stay on top of developments in the field, and I said, “Twitter.” Even before I had any smart handheld devices, I was regularly using Twitter to learn from others in the field of learning technology and tech innovation generally. Even on extremely busy days, I can take a quick skim through Twitter, retweet a couple of things or put a couple of things on Scoop.it. Not only have I learnt from the blog post or news item, I have shared it, and often get some response on it — so in 20 minutes or so, I have done valuable horizon-scanning, learning, and networking in my field. Continue reading

The internet is after your job

The internet is after your job

The internet is after your job! According to this video at any rate.

“New technology can destroy jobs. In the past, this has mainly affected unskilled jobs, but now it’s hitting the middle classes – cutting a swathe across the creative industries and ‘professions’. Within a generation we may find that there are no such things as a ‘career’ or ‘job security’. What’s driving this disruption to our working lives – and what can you do about it?”

Among other industries previously affected, including manual jobs, it is now the working class world of teachers, lawyers, and doctors that are under fire from technology-inspired application – MOOCs anyone?

The trick, which most of us already know, is to carve your own niche and stand out from the crowd. Be unique, be yourself, and stay relevant.

The internet is after your job
The internet is after your job

Edublog Awards 2014 #eddies14

2014 EduBlogs Awards #eddies14

Edublog Awards 2014Yes, thanks to Chris Rowell (and for the nomination), I’ve realised it’s that time of year again … Edublog Awards.

“The Edublog Awards started in 2004 in response to community concerns relating to how schools, districts and educational intitutions were blocking access of learner and teacher blog sites for educational purposes.  The purpose of the Edublog awards is promote and demonstrate the educational values of these social media.”

A thoroughly good event to get involved in, and be nominated for too. Let’s try and get more UK nominations and success stories this year please?

I nominate:

Thank you. Nominations are open for a while longer (hint) and voting will open shortly after that (hint hint).

Interview with Sheila MacNeil and David Walker, #EdTechBook chapter authors

Interview with Sheila MacNeill and David Walker, #EdTechBook chapter authors

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this sixth post I talk to Sheila MacNeill (Senior Lecturer, Glasgow Caledonian University) and David Walker (Head of Technology Enhanced Learning, Sussex University), who have chosen to co-author a chapter for the book on Learning Technologists as ‘digital pedagogues’.

DH – Hi David and Sheila. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

SM – Good question. In reality, without using technology I wouldn’t be able to do my work. Almost everything I do at work relies on technology. Face to face communication is still very important, but I do all my “stuff” via technology, be that my desktop computer, my iPad or phone. If the “t’internet” is down at work I’m a bit stuffed! I would probably use up a months data allowance on my phone in a morning – or go home and work there. Luckily that doesn’t happen very often.  Continue reading

David Hopkins / Technology Enhanced Learning Blog

I need your vote – UK Blog Awards #UKBA15

I was very surprised to find I’ve been nominated for the UK Blog Awards, 2015!

Voting is open from Monday 10th November, 2014, until Monday 1st December, 2014.

I’ve been nominated in two categories, please be sure to click on the right link below for the right category you want .. or both ;-) (PS. they won’t add them together):

David Hopkins / Technology Enhanced Learning Blog
David Hopkins / Technology Enhanced Learning Blog

The next stage in the voting/judging process involves 20 finalists will be chosen to face an expert judging panel, with the winners being announced at an award ceremony in April 2015.

Please spend a minute voting for me (name and email needed), see if we can get recognition for a non-commercial, private, passionate, professional (motivational?), and self-hosted eLearning blog. Please also share this post and your vote on social media using the #UKBA15 and #BeBold tags.

Thank you.

Background – I started this blog in October 2008 more for my own interest, as somewhere I can write my own thoughts on things I find and read, and as somewhere I can refer back to. I had no notion of blogging itself, the community at large, and the world it opens up at that time, nor did I realise how influential I would find it in my professional development, reflection, or for other people who shared my love of all things ‘gadget technology + learning’. Whilst my interest and work takes up all aspects of eLearning, Learning Technolgoy, Education Technology, Technology Enhanced Learning, Mobile Learning, Personal Learning, Social Learning, etc. this blog is where I can explore more than just what I need for my day-to-day work – I can explore wider reading and journal activities, I can report on events, I can critique approaches and ideas that others propose. I can also just have a bit of fun and share something relevant but not necessarily ‘core’ to my role as a Learning Technologist or eLearning Consultant.

The Future of Higher Education in a Digital Age

If the student voice has so much power, as I keep reading that it does (when it comes to module feedback, learning resource development, pricing, etc.) then it stands to reason that the voice of students yet to reach Higher Education also have a voice that should be heard?

This is a great video, students and staff alike, saying what their ‘digital age’ education should be … note the accessible, flexible, personal, social, and collaborative  attitudes these students ‘want’ from their learning. Yes, they’re talking about what HE should be in the future, but it’s grounded in their understanding in what is currently available, and possibly what they wish they had already?

“I see technology as the accelerator, the expander, the multiplier.”

YouTube: The Future of Higher Education in a Digital Age

Thanks to Anne Hole for sharing this on G+ earlier today.

Interview with Sharon Flynn, #EdTechBook chapter author

Interview with Sharon Flynn, #EdTechBook chapter author

The Really Useful #EdTechBook, edited by David HopkinsAs part of a series of posts, I will be talking to authors of The Really Useful #EdTechBook about their work, experiences, and contribution to the book. In this fifth post I talk to Sharon Flynn, Assistant Director at the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, National University of Ireland, Galway.

DH – Hi Sharon. How does the use of technology, in all its various forms, affect your day-to-day working life?

SF – Almost everything I do, on a daily basis, is affected by technology. From the radio alarm waking me in the morning, the coffee machine that provides the kick to get me started, the always-on aspect of my mobile phone, the constant expectation of availability by email/phone during (and outwith) office hours, my almost constant presence on twitter, my new slow cooker that allows me plan family meals, through to the glorious availability of anything I want to watch on sky+, my day is mostly ruled by technology. And that’s before I get into the proper work aspects of technology for teaching and learning!  Continue reading

eLearning, mLearning, Blackboard, Blogging, Social Media, and the stuff in between / David Hopkins